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How Theology Shaped Twentieth-Century Philosophy

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  • Date Published: March 2019
  • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • format: Adobe eBook Reader
  • isbn: 9781108597753

$ 80.00 USD ( )
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  • Medieval theology had an important influence on later philosophy which is visible in the empiricisms of Russell, Carnap, and Quine. Other thinkers, including McDowell, Kripke, and Dennett, show how we can overcome the distorting effects of that theological ecosystem on our accounts of the nature of reality and our relationship to it. In a different philosophical tradition, Hegel uses a secularized version of Christianity to argue for a kind of human knowledge that overcomes the influences of late-medieval voluntarism, and some twentieth-century thinkers, including Benjamin and Derrida, instead defend a Jewish-influenced notion of the religious sublime. Frank B. Farrell analyzes and connects philosophers of different eras and traditions to show that modern philosophy has developed its practices on a terrain marked out by earlier theological and religious ideas, and considers how different philosophers have both embraced, and tried to escape from, those deep-seated patterns of thought.

    • Discusses theology in the Middle Ages and the twentieth century, reanalyzing philosophical links between Jewish and Christian thinkers
    • Shows how earlier theological beliefs can have a profound, if often overlooked, influence on philosophical positions today
    • Brings the work of numerous major figures into a unified, broad and persuasive narrative, providing new perspectives on overarching philosophical concerns
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    Product details

    • Date Published: March 2019
    • format: Adobe eBook Reader
    • isbn: 9781108597753
    • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • Table of Contents

    Acknowledgments
    Introduction: the thinning out of the world
    1. Empiricism and theology
    2. John McDowell: rejecting the defensive move inward
    3. Aristotle redivivus: on Saul Kripke
    4. Hegel, theology, and Pippin's reading of Hegel
    5. Walter Benjamin: incarnation or radical incommensurability?
    6. Rolling back the Protestant Reformation: Wittgenstein and Dennett
    7. McDowell (II): active and passive faculties and the theological framework
    8. Derrida, the religion of the sublime, and the messianic
    9. Literature today and the sublime absence of aesthetic experience
    10. Where do we go from here?
    Bibliography
    Index.

  • Author

    Frank B. Farrell, State University of New York, Purchase
    Frank B. Farrell is Emeritus Professor of Philosophy at Purchase College, State University of New York. His publications include Subjectivity, Realism, and Postmodernism: The Recovery of the World in Recent Philosophy (Cambridge, 1994) and Why Does Literature Matter? (2004).

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