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Modern Quantum Mechanics

2nd Edition

$60.00 ( ) USD

  • Date Published: December 2017
  • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • format: Adobe eBook Reader
  • isbn: 9781108527422

$ 60.00 USD ( )
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About the Authors
  • Modern Quantum Mechanics is a classic graduate level textbook, covering the main quantum mechanics concepts in a clear, organized and engaging manner. The author, Jun John Sakurai, was a renowned theorist in particle theory. The second edition, revised by Jim Napolitano, introduces topics that extend the text's usefulness into the twenty-first century, such as advanced mathematical techniques associated with quantum mechanical calculations, while at the same time retaining classic developments such as neutron interferometer experiments, Feynman path integrals, correlation measurements, and Bell's inequality. A solution manual for instructors using this textbook can be downloaded from www.cambridge.org/9781108422413.

    • Includes explicit solutions to the Schrödinger Wave Equation, including the linear potential, the simple harmonic oscillator using generating functions, and the derivation of spherical harmonics
    • Discusses SO(4) symmetry and its applications to solving the hydrogen atom and approximation techniques based on extreme time dependences in the early chapters
    • Contains experimental demonstration of quantum mechanical phenomena, including the Stern–Gerlach experiment on cesium atoms, muon spin rotation and g-2, neutrino oscillations, 'bouncing' ultracold neutrons, Berry's phase with neutrons, elastic scattering of protons from nuclei, the effects of exchange symmetry in nuclear decay, and the Casimir effect, among others
    • Covers advanced mathematical techniques (for example, generating functions and contour integrals) associated with quantum mechanical calculations
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    Product details

    • Edition: 2nd Edition
    • Date Published: December 2017
    • format: Adobe eBook Reader
    • isbn: 9781108527422
    • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • Table of Contents

    1. Fundamental concepts
    2. Quantum dynamics
    3. Theory of angular momentum
    4. Symmetry in quantum mechanics
    5. Approximation methods
    6. Scattering theory
    7. Identical particles
    8. Relativistic quantum mechanics
    Appendix A. Electromagnetic units
    Appendix B. Brief summary of elementary solutions to Schrödinger's Wave Equation
    Appendix C. Proof of the angular-momentum addition rule given by equation (3.8.38).

  • Resources for

    Modern Quantum Mechanics

    J. J. Sakurai, Jim Napolitano

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  • Authors

    J. J. Sakurai
    J. J. Sakurai was a noted theorist in particle physics. He received his B.A. from Harvard University in 1955 and his Ph.D. from Cornell University in 1958. He was appointed as an assistant professor at the University of Chicago, where he worked until he became a professor at the University of California, Los Angeles in 1970. Sakurai died in 1982 while he was visiting a professor at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland.

    Jim Napolitano, Temple University, Philadelphia
    Jim Napolitano earned an undergraduate Physics degree at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 1977, and a Ph.D. in Physics from Stanford University in 1982. Since that time, he has conducted research in experimental nuclear and particle physics, with an emphasis on studying fundamental interactions and symmetries. He joined the faculty at Rensselaer in 1992 after working as a member of the scientific staff at two different national laboratories. Since 2014 he has been Professor of Physics at Temple University, Philadelphia. He is author and co-author of over 150 scientific papers in refereed journals. Professor Napolitano maintains a keen interest in science education in general, and in particular physics education at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. He has taught both graduate and upper-level undergraduate courses in Quantum Mechanics, as well as an advanced graduate course in Quantum Field Theory.

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