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Systems in Crisis
New Imperatives of High Politics at Century's End

$51.99 (C)

Part of Cambridge Studies in International Relations

  • Date Published: January 2008
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9780521054782

$ 51.99 (C)
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About the Authors
  • Uncertainty is the watchword of contemporary world politics. Monumental changes are occurring throughout the international system and statespeople are wrestling with peaceful solutions to them. In this book, Charles Doran proposes a managed solution to peaceful change. He presents a bold, original and wide-ranging analysis of the present balance of power, of future prospects for the international political system and of the problems involved in this transformation. Professor Doran demonstrates why such change has often been accompanied by world war and provides new insights into the causes of World War I. Developing a theory of the power cycle, the author reveals the structural bounds on statecraft and shows how the tides of history can suddenly and unexpectedly shift against the state.

    • A wide-ranging analysis of the present balance of power and the future prospects for peaceful change in the world order
    • In the course of his analysis Professor Doran offers new insights into the causes of the First World War
    • A unique combination of international relations theory and empirical tests, this book incorporates over twenty years of Professor Doran's research into the ideas of power cycle theory
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    Reviews & endorsements

    "...a wide-ranging and incisive book...among the most important theoretical and empirical additions to the causes-of-war literature of the past decade." American Political Review

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    Product details

    • Date Published: January 2008
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9780521054782
    • length: 316 pages
    • dimensions: 229 x 152 x 18 mm
    • weight: 0.47kg
    • contains: 13 b/w illus. 5 tables
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Preface
    Acknowledgements
    Introduction: new perspectives on the causes and management of systems crisis
    Part I. Dynamics of State Power and Role: Systems Structure:
    1. What is power cycle theory? Introducing the main concepts
    2. Measuring national capability and power 3. The cycle of state power and role
    Part II. Dynamics of Major War and Systems Transformation:
    4. Critical intervals on the power cycle: why wars become major
    5. Systemic disequilibrium and world war
    Part III. Dynamics of General Equilibrium and World Order:
    6. Prerequisites of world order: international political equilibrium
    7. World order and systems transformation: guidelines for statecraft
    Part IV. Systems Transformation and World Order at Century's End:
    8. Systems change since 1945: instability at critical points and awareness of the power cycle
    9. Is decline inevitable? US leadership and the systemic security dilemma
    10. Systems transformation and the new imperatives of high politics
    Appendix: mathematical relations in the power cycle
    References
    Index.

  • Author

    Charles F. Doran, The Johns Hopkins University

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