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Developmental Contexts in Middle Childhood
Bridges to Adolescence and Adulthood

$40.99 (C)

Part of Cambridge Studies in Social and Emotional Development

Robert C. Granger, Aletha C. Huston, Marika N. Ripke, W. Andrew Collins, Manfred van Dulmen, Gregory S. Pettit, John E. Bates, Amy Holtzworth-Munroe, Amy D. Marshall, Lori D. Harach, David J. Cleary, Kenneth A. Dodge, L. Rowell Huesmann, Eric F. Dubow, Leonard D. Eron, Paul Boxer, Sally J. Wadsworth, Robin Corley, Robert Plomin, John K. Hewitt, John C. DeFries, Sara R. Jaffee, Richie Poulton, Linda S. Pagani, Christa Japel, Alain Girard, Abdeljelil Farhat, Sylvana Côté, Richard E. Tremblay, Katherine Magnuson, Greg J. Duncan, Ariel Kalil, Doris R. Entwisle, Karl L. Alexander, Linda Steffel Olson, Penny Hauser-Cram, Marji Erickson Warfield, Jennifer Stadler, Selcuk R. Sirin, NICHD Early Child Care Research Network, Pamela Morris, David M. Casey, Sandra D. Simpkins, Jennifer A. Fredricks, Pamela E. Davis-Kean, Jacquelynne S. Eccles, Laramie D. Taylor, Leon Feinstein, John Bynner, Sharon M. McGroder, Martha J. Zaslow, Kristin A. Moore, Jennifer L. Brooks, Hirokazu Yoshikawa, Lisa Gennetian, Amanda L. Roy, Anna Gassman-Pines, Erin B. Godfrey, Sylvia R. Epps, Mi Suk Shim, Danielle A. Crosby
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  • Date Published: September 2010
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9780521175548

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About the Authors
  • During middle childhood, the period between ages 5 and 12, children gain the basic tools, skills, and motivations to become productive members of their society. Failure to acquire these basic tools can lead to long-term consequences for children’s future education, work, and family life. In this book the editors assemble contributions from fifteen longitudinal studies representing diverse groups in the United States, Canada, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom to learn what developmental patterns and experiences in middle childhood contexts forecast the directions children take when they reach adolescence and adulthood. The editors conclude that, although lasting individual differences are evident by the end of the preschool years, a child’s developmental path in middle childhood contributes significantly to the adolescent and adult that he or she becomes. Families, peers, and the broader social and economic environment all make a difference for young people’s future education, work, and relationships with others.

    • Covers an important but previously neglected period of children's development
    • Provides information about the environments that are important for child and youth development
    • Presents state-of-the-art longitudinal data following children from early and middle childhood into adolescence and adulthood
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    "This volume continues the tradition of excellence associated with the 'Studies in Social and Emotional Development' series….Highly recommended."
    -- Choice

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    Product details

    • Date Published: September 2010
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9780521175548
    • length: 480 pages
    • dimensions: 229 x 152 x 27 mm
    • weight: 0.7kg
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Foreword Robert C. Granger
    Acknowledgments
    1. Middle childhood: contexts of development Aletha C. Huston and Marika N. Ripke
    2. The significance of middle childhood peer competence for work and relationships in early adulthood W. Andrew Collins and Manfred van Dulmen
    3. Aggression and insecurity in late adolescent romantic relationships: antecedents and developmental pathways Gregory S. Pettit, John E. Bates, Amy Holtzworth-Munroe, Amy D. Marshall, Lori D. Harach, David J. Cleary and Kenneth A. Dodge
    4. Middle childhood family-contextual and personal factors as predictors of adult outcomes L. Rowell Huesmann, Eric F. Dubow, Leonard D. Eron and Paul Boxer
    5. Genetic and environmental influences on continuity and change in reading achievement in the Colorado Adoption Project Sally J. Wadsworth, Robin Corley, Robert Plomin, John K. Hewitt and John C. DeFries
    6. Reciprocal effects of mothers' depression and children's problem behaviors from middle childhood to early adolescence Sara R. Jaffee and Richie Poulton
    7. Middle childhood life course trajectories: links between family dysfunction and children's behavioral development Linda S. Pagani, Christa Japel, Alain Girard, Abdeljelil Farhat, Sylvana Côté and Richard E. Tremblay
    8. The contribution of middle childhood contexts to adolescent achievement and behavior Katherine Magnuson, Greg J. Duncan and Ariel Kalil
    9. Educational tracking within and between schools: from first grade through middle school and beyond Doris R. Entwisle, Karl L. Alexander and Linda Steffel Olson
    10. School environments and the diverging pathways of students living in poverty Penny Hauser-Cram, Marji Erickson Warfield, Jennifer Stadler and Selcuk R. Sirin
    11. The relations of classroom contexts in the early elementary years to children's classroom and social behavior NICHD Early Child Care Research Network
    12. Out-of-school time use during middle childhood in a low-income sample: do combinations of activities affect achievement and behavior? Pamela Morris and Ariel Kalil
    13. Low-income children's activity participation as a predictor of psychosocial and academic outcomes in middle childhood and adolescence Marika N. Ripke, Aletha C. Huston and David M. Casey
    14. Healthy mind, healthy habits: the influence of activity involvement in middle childhood Sandra D. Simpkins, Jennifer A. Fredricks, Pamela E. Davis-Kean and Jacquelynne S. Eccles
    15. Media effects in middle childhood L. Rowell Huesmann and Laramie D. Taylor
    16. Continuity and discontinuity in middle childhood: implications for adult outcomes in the UK 1970 birth cohort Leon Feinstein and John Bynner
    17. Mandatory welfare-to-work programs and preschool-age children: do impacts persist into middle childhood? Sharon M. McGroder, Martha J. Zaslow, Kristin A. Moore and Jennifer L. Brooks
    18. Effects of welfare and employment policies on middle-childhood school performance: do they vary by race/ethnicity, and if so, why? Hirokazu Yoshikawa, Pamela Morris, Lisa Gennetian, Amanda L. Roy, Anna Gassman-Pines and Erin B. Godfrey
    19. Effects of a family poverty intervention program lasting from middle childhood to adolescence Aletha C. Huston, Sylvia R. Epps, Mi Suk Shim, Greg J. Duncan, Danielle A. Crosby and Marika N. Ripke
    20. Experiences in middle childhood and children's development: a summary and integration of research Aletha C. Huston and Marika N. Ripke.

  • Editors

    Aletha C. Huston, University of Texas, Austin
    Aletha C. Huston is Priscilla Pond Flawn Regents Professor of Child Development at the University of Texas, Austin. She is a developmental psychologist who specializes in understanding the effects of poverty on children and the impact of child care and income support policies on children's development. She is a Principal Investigator in the New Hope Project, a study of the effects on children and families of parents' participation in a work-based program to reduce poverty, and collaborator in the Next Generation Project. She was a member of the MacArthur Network on Successful Pathways Through Middle Childhood and an Investigator for the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development. She is President of the Society for Research in Child Development and Past President of the Division of Developmental Psychology of the American Psychological Association.

    Marika N. Ripke, University of Texas, Austin
    Marika N. Ripke is the Director of Hawaii Kids Count and an affiliate faculty member of the Center on the Family at the University of Hawaii, Manoa. Her research specializes on the effects of poverty on children and the impact of out-of-school activities on child and youth development. As director of Hawaii Kids Count, she assesses (and advocates for) the well-being of Hawaii's children and families by monitoring various health, economic and educational indicators over time. She directs the data collection and analysis of a study examining the quality and availability of education and health supports for Native Hawaiian families and their young children. She holds a governmental position as a voting member of the State of Hawaii's Commission on Fatherhood. Her publications have appeared in the Handbook of Child Psychology and in such scholarly journals as Developmental Psychology, the Review of Research in Education and New Directions in Youth Development.

    Contributors

    Robert C. Granger, Aletha C. Huston, Marika N. Ripke, W. Andrew Collins, Manfred van Dulmen, Gregory S. Pettit, John E. Bates, Amy Holtzworth-Munroe, Amy D. Marshall, Lori D. Harach, David J. Cleary, Kenneth A. Dodge, L. Rowell Huesmann, Eric F. Dubow, Leonard D. Eron, Paul Boxer, Sally J. Wadsworth, Robin Corley, Robert Plomin, John K. Hewitt, John C. DeFries, Sara R. Jaffee, Richie Poulton, Linda S. Pagani, Christa Japel, Alain Girard, Abdeljelil Farhat, Sylvana Côté, Richard E. Tremblay, Katherine Magnuson, Greg J. Duncan, Ariel Kalil, Doris R. Entwisle, Karl L. Alexander, Linda Steffel Olson, Penny Hauser-Cram, Marji Erickson Warfield, Jennifer Stadler, Selcuk R. Sirin, NICHD Early Child Care Research Network, Pamela Morris, David M. Casey, Sandra D. Simpkins, Jennifer A. Fredricks, Pamela E. Davis-Kean, Jacquelynne S. Eccles, Laramie D. Taylor, Leon Feinstein, John Bynner, Sharon M. McGroder, Martha J. Zaslow, Kristin A. Moore, Jennifer L. Brooks, Hirokazu Yoshikawa, Lisa Gennetian, Amanda L. Roy, Anna Gassman-Pines, Erin B. Godfrey, Sylvia R. Epps, Mi Suk Shim, Danielle A. Crosby

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