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The Developmental Psychology of Music

The Developmental Psychology of Music

$47.99 (C)

  • Date Published: February 1987
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9780521314152
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$ 47.99 (C)
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  • This book sets out the psychological basis of musical development in children and adults. The study has two major objectives: to review the research findings, theories and methodologies relevant to the developmental study of music; and to offer a framework within which these can be organised so as to pave the way for future research. It describes the relationship between thinking and music, and discusses the relationship between thinking and music in pre-schoolers and schoolchildren in areas such as singing, aesthetic appreciation, rhythmic and melodic development, and the acquisition of harmony and tonality. The book describes the development of musical taste, and discusses the questions of musical creativity, and of the social psychology of musical taste and fashion. As a comprehensive study of the links between developmental psychology and music education, Hargreaves' work demonstrates the practical and theoretical importance of psychological research on the process underlying children's musical perception, cognition and performance.

    Customer reviews

    10th Jan 2014 by Willimek

    Music and Emotions The most difficult problem in answering the question of how music creates emotions is likely to be the fact that assignments of musical elements and emotions can never be defined clearly. The solution of this problem is the Theory of Musical Equilibration. It says that music cant convey any emotion at all, but merely volitional processes, the music listener identifies with. Then in the process of identifying the volitional processes are colored with emotions. The same happens when we watch an exciting film and identify with the volitional processes of our favorite figures. Here, too, just the process of identification generates emotions. An example: If you perceive a major chord, you normally identify with the will Yes, I want to.... The experience of listening to a minor chord can be compared to the message conveyed when someone says, No more. If someone were to say these words slowly and quietly, they would create the impression of being sad, whereas if they were to scream it quickly and loudly, they would be come across as furious. This distinction also applies for the emotional character of a minor chord: if a minor harmony is repeated faster and at greater volume, its sad nature appears to have suddenly turned into fury. Because this detour of emotions via volitional processes was not detected, also all music psychological and neurological experiments, to answer the question of the origin of the emotions in the music, failed. But how music can convey volitional processes? These volitional processes have something to do with the phenomena which early music theorists called lead, leading tone or striving effects. If we reverse this musical phenomena in imagination into its opposite not the sound wants to change - but the listener identifies with a will not to change the sound we have found the contents of will, the music listener identifies with. In practice, everything becomes a bit more complicated, so that even more sophisticated volitional processes can be represented musically. Further information is available via the free download of the e-book Music and Emotion - Research on the Theory of Musical Equilibration: www.willimekmusic.de/music-and-emotions.pdf or on the online journal EUNOMIOS: www.eunomios.org Enjoy reading Bernd Willimek, music theorist

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    Product details

    • Date Published: February 1987
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9780521314152
    • length: 272 pages
    • dimensions: 234 x 156 x 15 mm
    • weight: 0.39kg
    • contains: 19 b/w illus. 8 tables 14 music examples
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Preface
    1. The developmental psychology of music
    2. Children's thinking and musical development
    3. Musical development in the preschooler
    4. Musical development in the schoolchild
    5. Development of responses to music
    6. Creativity, personality, and musical development
    7. Social psychology and musical development
    8. Development psychology and music education
    References
    Author index
    Subject index.

  • Author

    David J. Hargreaves, Roehampton University, London

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