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Power in Close Relationships

$110.00 (C)

Part of Advances in Personal Relationships

Gillian A. Mccabe, Virgil Zeigler-Hill, Emily J. Cross, Nickola C. Overall, Ximena B. Arriaga, Michael Ioerger, Laura E. Vanderdrift, I-Ching Lee, Felicia Pratto, Judy Y. Tan, Allison K. Farrell, Alexander J. Rothman, Jeffry A. Simpson, Christopher R. Agnew, Jennifer J. Harman, Elizabeth Keneski, Andrew L. Stewart, J. Kale Monk, Brian G. Ogolsky, Angela M. Whittaker, Michelle R. Kaufman, Julie Pulerwitz, Emily A. Impett, James J. Kim, Mariko L. Visserman, Michael E. Roloff, Denise Haunani Solomon, Quinten Bernhold, Norah E. Dunbar
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  • Date Published: April 2019
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781107192614

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About the Authors
  • Power is an inherent feature of social interactions, yet it is hard to define and therefore understand. This book is the first to organize current interdisciplinary theorizing and research about power from leading academics in areas such as social psychology, communications, family studies, and public health. It also focuses exclusively on how power operates and affects close relationship processes, while the theoretical insights provided point the way toward new lines of research and understanding. Using specific examples to illustrate complex theoretical explanations and supplying thorough descriptions of the existing literature on power in close relationships, this book is an essential resource for researchers, professionals, students, or laypeople seeking to better understand how power operates in those relationships that are most important to us.

    • Presents multiple theoretical perspectives to offer a unique overview of the research surrounding power in close relationships
    • Supplies specific examples of theoretical applications in practice
    • Proposes new theoretical insights and suggestions for future research and theoretical extensions
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    Reviews & endorsements

    ‘Why do some people have more power than others? When do people use their power for good versus ill? These are among the essential questions that are asked and answered by this stellar and interdisciplinary line-up of scholars. The book is marvelous, and it's a blast to read!' Eli J. Finkel, author of The All-Or-Nothing Marriage and Northwestern University

    ‘Power has been the neglected stepchild throughout most of the history of relationship science. Combining insightful theories and cutting-edge research, this volume should do much to change that. If you study, teach, or use relationship research, you won't want to miss this important and thought-provoking advance.' Harry Reis, University of Rochester

    ‘This excellent edited volume, compiled by two leaders in the interdisciplinary field of close relationships, fills a gap in the current research on close relationships. This book summarizes several theoretical approaches to power, then explains how power and related phenomena are expressed in different interpersonal contexts.' Susan Sprecher, Distinguished Professor, Illinois State University

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    Product details

    • Date Published: April 2019
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9781107192614
    • length: 294 pages
    • dimensions: 235 x 156 x 20 mm
    • weight: 0.55kg
    • contains: 3 b/w illus. 4 tables
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    An evolutionary perspective on the role of status in close relationships Gillian A. Mccabe and Virgil Zeigler-Hill
    2. Attachment insecurity and the regulation of power and dependence in intimate relationships Emily J. Cross and Nickola C. Overall
    3. Interdependence perspectives on power in relationships Ximena B. Arriaga, Michael Ioerger and Laura E. Vanderdrift
    4. Leveraging power in intimate partner relationships: a power basis perspective I-Ching Lee, Felicia Pratto and Judy Y. Tan
    5. The dyadic power-social influence model: extensions and future directions Allison K. Farrell, Alexander J. Rothman and Jeffry A. Simpson
    6. The impact of multilevel sources of power on intimate relationship functioning Christopher R. Agnew, Jennifer J. Harman, Elizabeth Keneski and Andrew L. Stewart
    7. Power in families J. Kale Monk, Brian G. Ogolsky and Angela M. Whittaker
    8. When sex is power: gender roles in sex and their consequences Michelle R. Kaufman and Julie Pulerwitz
    9. Power in close intimate relationships Emily A. Impett, James J. Kim and Mariko L. Visserman
    10. Power and interpersonal violence
    11. Power and interpersonal communication Michael E. Roloff and Denise Haunani Solomon
    12. Interpersonal power and nonverbal communication Quinten Bernhold and Norah E. Dunbar.

  • Editors

    Christopher R. Agnew, Purdue University, Indiana
    Christopher R. Agnew is Professor of Psychological Sciences at Purdue University, Indiana, where he currently serves as Associate Vice President for Research. As a social psychologist, his research focuses on interpersonal relationships and using relational theories to understand broader social and health processes.

    Jennifer J. Harman, Colorado State University
    Jennifer J. Harman is Associate Professor of Psychology at Colorado State University. Her research has focused on perceptions and power in intimate relationships, most recently with how these concepts affect relationships and families after they have dissolved.

    Contributors

    Gillian A. Mccabe, Virgil Zeigler-Hill, Emily J. Cross, Nickola C. Overall, Ximena B. Arriaga, Michael Ioerger, Laura E. Vanderdrift, I-Ching Lee, Felicia Pratto, Judy Y. Tan, Allison K. Farrell, Alexander J. Rothman, Jeffry A. Simpson, Christopher R. Agnew, Jennifer J. Harman, Elizabeth Keneski, Andrew L. Stewart, J. Kale Monk, Brian G. Ogolsky, Angela M. Whittaker, Michelle R. Kaufman, Julie Pulerwitz, Emily A. Impett, James J. Kim, Mariko L. Visserman, Michael E. Roloff, Denise Haunani Solomon, Quinten Bernhold, Norah E. Dunbar

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