Skip to content
Register Sign in Wishlist

Institutional Slavery
Slaveholding Churches, Schools, Colleges, and Businesses in Virginia, 1680–1860

$88.00 USD

  • Date Published: September 2016
  • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • format: Adobe eBook Reader
  • isbn: 9781316496770

$ 88.00 USD
Adobe eBook Reader

You will be taken to ebooks.com for this purchase
Buy eBook Add to wishlist

Other available formats:
Hardback


Looking for an inspection copy?

This title is not currently available on inspection

Description
Product filter button
Description
Contents
Resources
Courses
About the Authors
  • The traditional image of slavery begins with a master and a slave. However, not all slaves had traditional masters; some were owned instead by institutions, such as church congregations, schools, colleges, and businesses. This practice was pervasive in early Virginia; its educational, religious, and philanthropic institutions were literally built on the backs of slaves. Virginia's first industrial economy was also developed with the skilled labor of African American slaves. This book focuses on institutional slavery in Virginia as it was practiced by the Anglican and Presbyterian churches, free schools, and four universities: the College of William and Mary, Hampden-Sydney College, the University of Virginia, and Hollins College. It also examines the use of slave labor by businesses and the Commonwealth of Virginia in industrial endeavors. This is not only an account of how institutions used slavery to further their missions, but also of the slaves who belonged to institutions.

    • The first book to look at slave holding by many different institutions at once, thereby putting the phenomenon in context
    • Will be of interest to historians of slavery, as it brings attention to a less-known aspect of the slave system
    • Will also be of interest to historians of American religious, educational, and business history
    Read more

    Reviews & endorsements

    'An important study that breaks new ground - with rich detail and sophisticated analysis - on the institutional ownership of slaves in the American South. Oast's depiction of how churches and colleges utilized slaves is especially revealing, as is her discussion of how slaves fared under non-personal ownership. A significant contribution to scholarship on slavery.' John B. Boles, Rice University, Houston

    'This is the most comprehensive study yet of institutional as opposed to plantation slavery in the Old Dominion. It implicates churches and educational establishments as well as businesses in the most impersonal and often least caring form of slavery and shows how even the poorest of non-slave-holding whites benefited from it.' Daniel C. Littlefield, University of South Carolina

    'Institutional Slavery represents a thought-provoking intervention in the literature on the evolution of slavery and paternalism in Virginia …' Kirt von Daacke, History of Education Quarterly

    'Institutional Slavery will surely aid these worthwhile efforts by providing essential historical context and a model for further research.' Adam Rothman, Journal of Social History

    'Institutional Slavery is recommended for use in both undergraduate and graduate classes. While it sheds light on the treatment of enslaved African Americans and on their everyday lives, it also illuminates the nature of ownership. … [the book] provides insights into previously understudied aspects of slavery in the making of American society.' Marne L. Campbell, The Journal of African American History

    See more reviews

    Customer reviews

    Not yet reviewed

    Be the first to review

    Review was not posted due to profanity

    ×

    , create a review

    (If you're not , sign out)

    Please enter the right captcha value
    Please enter a star rating.
    Your review must be a minimum of 12 words.

    How do you rate this item?

    ×

    Product details

    • Date Published: September 2016
    • format: Adobe eBook Reader
    • isbn: 9781316496770
    • contains: 8 b/w illus.
    • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction
    1. 'Unlawful for any Christian': slave-owning Anglican churches in Virginia
    2. 'The legacies of well inclin'd gentlemen': slave-owning free schools in Virginia
    3. 'The worst kind of slavery': slave-owning Presbyterian churches in Virginia
    4. 'So large a family as the college': slavery at the College of William and Mary
    5. 'Faithful and valuable': slavery at Hampden-Sydney College, the University of Virginia, and Hollins College
    6. 'To make a trifle for themselves': industries as institutional slaveholders
    Conclusion.

  • Author

    Jennifer Oast, Bloomsburg University, Pennsylvania
    Jennifer Oast is an Associate Professor of History at Bloomsburg University, Pennsylvania.

Sign In

Please sign in to access your account

Cancel

Not already registered? Create an account now. ×

Sorry, this resource is locked

Please register or sign in to request access. If you are having problems accessing these resources please email lecturers@cambridge.org

Register Sign in
Please note that this file is password protected. You will be asked to input your password on the next screen.

» Proceed

You are now leaving the Cambridge University Press website. Your eBook purchase and download will be completed by our partner www.ebooks.com. Please see the permission section of the www.ebooks.com catalogue page for details of the print & copy limits on our eBooks.

Continue ×

Continue ×

Continue ×

Find content that relates to you

Join us online

This site uses cookies to improve your experience. Read more Close

Are you sure you want to delete your account?

This cannot be undone.

Cancel

Thank you for your feedback which will help us improve our service.

If you requested a response, we will make sure to get back to you shortly.

×
Please fill in the required fields in your feedback submission.
×