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De-Industrialization

De-Industrialization
Social, Cultural, and Political Aspects

Part of International Review of Social History Supplements

Bert Altena, Marcel van der Linden, Christopher Johnson, Franco Barchiesi, Bridget Kenny, Darren G. Lilleker, Stefan Goch, Robert Forrant, Gregory Wilson, Chitra Joshi, Tarik Sengul
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  • Date Published: February 2003
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9780521532167

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  • De-industrialization processes have accompanied industrialization from the start, both regionally and globally. Most historical studies of de-industrialization focus on economic issues, including structural causes and forms of unemployment. Much less attention is usually paid to the social and cultural aspects. What are the consequences of de-industrialization for working-class families and their communities? How does de-industrialization affect working-class culture, trade unions, traditional labour parties, and the regional social, educational and cultural infrastructure? Are gender relations changed by de-industrialization? These subjects are explored by the contributors to this volume. Their essays deal with effects of de-industrialization processes in different contexts. In doing so they propose a wide scope for the study of industrial devolution.

    • Unique in paying attention to the social and cultural aspects of de-industrialization
    • Explores how de-industrialization affects working-class culture, trade unions, traditional labour parties, and the regional social, educational and cultural infrastructure
    • Provides a wider scope for the study of industrial devolution
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    Product details

    • Date Published: February 2003
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9780521532167
    • length: 182 pages
    • dimensions: 224 x 150 x 10 mm
    • weight: 0.25kg
    • contains: 10 b/w illus.
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Preface Bert Altena and Marcel van der Linden
    Introduction. De-Industrialization and globalization Christopher Johnson
    1. From workshop to wasteland: deindustrialisation and fragmentation of the black working class on the East Rand (South Africa), 1990–9 Franco Barchiesi and Bridget Kenny
    2. Whose left? Working class political allegiances in post-industrial Britain Darren G. Lilleker
    3. Betterment without airs: social, cultural, and political consequences of the deindustrialization in the Ruhr Stefan Goch
    4. The International Association of Machinists, Pratt and Whitney and the struggle for a blue-collar future in Connecticut Robert Forrant
    5. 'Our chronic and desperate situation': anthracite communities and the emergence of redevelopment policy in Pennsylvania and the United States, 1945–65 Gregory Wilson
    6. The consequences of de-industrialization for women workers in the Indian textile industry Chitra Joshi
    7. De-industrialization in Turkish mining industries: the case of Zonguldak Tarik Sengul.

  • Editors

    Bert Altena, Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam

    Marcel van der Linden, International Institute of Social History, Amsterdam

    Contributors

    Bert Altena, Marcel van der Linden, Christopher Johnson, Franco Barchiesi, Bridget Kenny, Darren G. Lilleker, Stefan Goch, Robert Forrant, Gregory Wilson, Chitra Joshi, Tarik Sengul

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