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Migration and Ethnicity in Coalfield History

Migration and Ethnicity in Coalfield History
Global Perspectives

Part of International Review of Social History Supplements

  • Editors:
  • Ad Knotter, Universiteit Maastricht, Netherlands
  • David Mayer, Internationaal Instituut voor Sociale Geschiedenis, Amsterdam
Ad Knotter, David Mayer, Ian Phimister, Alfred Tembo, Carolyn Brown, Limin Teh, Tom Arents, Norihiko Tsuneishi, Joe Trotter, Clarice Speranza, Julia Landau, Erol Kahveci, Philip Slaby, Marion Fontaine, Diethelm Blecking
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  • Date Published: March 2016
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9781316601303

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  • Coal has been fundamental for the development of industrial and transport technologies since the nineteenth century. Globalisation, including colonialism, would not have been possible without coal-based energy and thus the exploitation of coal in every part of the world. But coal mining is a labour-intensive activity and mine operators had to find, mobilise and direct workers to these sites to enable exploitation. The recruitment of miners often targeted groups with a perceived inferior status. This turned coal mining communities into dense social spheres characterised by the intricate dynamics of ethnic identifications, interracial relations and class formation. The twelve articles presented in this volume cover cases from Africa, Asia, the Americas, Turkey, the Soviet Union and Western Europe, as well as a broad range of topics, from segregation, forced labour and subcontracting, to labour struggles, discrimination, ethnic paternalism and sports.

    • This volume looks at migration, forced labour, segregation, class formation and ethnic identity in an industry that has been fundamental for nineteenth- and early twentieth-century globalisation
    • Offers a global perspective on the history of coal mining communities, examining their intricate social dynamics
    • Contributions cover a diverse range of regions, including Africa, Asia, the Americas, the Soviet Union and Western Europe
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    Product details

    • Date Published: March 2016
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9781316601303
    • length: 296 pages
    • dimensions: 229 x 152 x 13 mm
    • weight: 0.43kg
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction: migration and ethnicity in coalfield history: global perspectives Ad Knotter and David Mayer
    1. Migration and ethnicity in coalfield history: global perspectives Ad Knotter
    2. A Zambian town in colonial Zimbabwe: the 1964 'Wangi Kolia' strike Ian Phimister and Alfred Tembo
    3. Locals and migrants in the coal mining town of Enugu (Nigeria): worker protest and urban identity 1914–1929 Carolyn Brown
    4. Labour control and mobility in Japanese-controlled Fushun coal mine (China), 1907–1932 Limin Teh
    5. The uneven recruitment of Korean miners in Japan in the 1910s and 1920s: employment strategies of the Miike and Chikuhō coal mining companies Tom Arents and Norihiko Tsuneishi
    6. The dynamics of race and ethnicity in the US coal industry Joe Trotter
    7. European workers in Brazilian coal mining, Rio Grande do Sul, 1850–1950 Clarice Speranza
    8. Specialists, spies, 'special settlers', and prisoners of war: social frictions in the Kuzbas (USSR), 1920–1950 Julia Landau
    9. Migration, ethnicity, and divisions of labour in the Zonguldak coalfield, Turkey Erol Kahveci
    10. Dissimilarity breeds contempt: ethnic paternalism, foreigners, and the state in Pas-de-Calais coal mining, France, 1920s Philip Slaby
    11. Football, migration, and coal mining in Northern France, 1920s–1980s Marion Fontaine
    12. Integration through sports? Polish migrants in the Ruhr Area, Germany Diethelm Blecking.

  • Editors

    Ad Knotter, Universiteit Maastricht, Netherlands
    Ad Knotter is Professor of Comparative Regional History at the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, Maastricht University, the Netherlands, and Director of the Sociaal Historisch Centrum voor Limburg (Center for the Social History of Limburg) at the same university. He is a member of the Editorial Committee of the International Review of Social History. His areas of research are comparative regional history and historical border studies, the comparative history of mining regions, labour history and migration history.

    David Mayer, Internationaal Instituut voor Sociale Geschiedenis, Amsterdam
    David Mayer is executive editor of the International Review of Social History. In 2011 he completed his PhD on the history of Marxist historiographic debates in Latin America in the 'long 1960s' (University of Vienna). He has spent lengthy research stays in Latin America. His main research interests are the history of social movements, the history of Marxism and left-wing intellectuals, and the history of historiography. He acts as vice-president of the International Conference of Labour and Social History (ITH).

    Contributors

    Ad Knotter, David Mayer, Ian Phimister, Alfred Tembo, Carolyn Brown, Limin Teh, Tom Arents, Norihiko Tsuneishi, Joe Trotter, Clarice Speranza, Julia Landau, Erol Kahveci, Philip Slaby, Marion Fontaine, Diethelm Blecking

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