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The Cambridge World History

Volume 4. A World with States, Empires and Networks 1200 BCE–900 CE

AUD$54.95 inc GST

Part of The Cambridge World History

Craig Benjamin, Sitta von Reden, Ping Yao, Scott Wells, Peter Hunt, Björn Wittrock, Helmuth Schneider, Robert Bagley, Tim May, Touraj Daryaee, Jeffrey Lerner, Merry Wiesner-Hanks, William Morison, Charles F. Pazdernik, Charles Holcombe, Xinzhong Yao, Xinru Liu, Shonaleeka Kaul, Janet Brashler, Erica Begun, Stephen H. Lekson, Ian McNiven, Stanley Burstein, Ralph Austen
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  • Date Published: November 2017
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9781108407717

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  • From 1200 BCE to 900 CE, the world witnessed the rise of powerful new states and empires, as well as networks of cross-cultural exchange and conquest. Considering the formation and expansion of these large-scale entities, this fourth volume of the Cambridge World History series outlines key economic, political, social, cultural, and intellectual developments that occurred across the globe in this period. Leading scholars examine critical transformations in science and technology, economic systems, attitudes towards gender and family, social hierarchies, education, art, and slavery. The second part of the volume focuses on broader processes of change within western and central Eurasia, the Mediterranean, South Asia, Africa, East Asia, Europe, the Americas and Oceania, as well as offering regional studies highlighting specific topics, from trade along the Silk Roads and across the Sahara, to Chaco culture in the US southwest, to Confucianism and the state in East Asia.

    • Brings together a team of leading classicists, archaeologists and world historians to offer a distinctive new global history of the ancient world
    • Explores key developments in the ancient world at three interacting scales: global, interregional, and regional
    • Represents the most recent thinking about global history in its exploration of the political, social, cultural, economic and intellectual developments of the period
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    Product details

    • Date Published: November 2017
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9781108407717
    • dimensions: 225 x 143 x 34 mm
    • weight: 1.05kg
    • contains: 69 b/w illus. 28 maps 3 tables
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Part I. Global Histories:
    1. Introduction: the world from 1200 BCE to 900 CE Craig Benjamin
    2. Global economic history Sitta von Reden
    3. The gendering of power in the family and the state Ping Yao and Scott Wells
    4. Slavery Peter Hunt
    5. The axial age in world history Björn Wittrock
    6. Developments in science and technology c.800 BCE to c.800 CE Helmuth Schneider
    7. Discourses on gender and sexuality Ping Yao and Scott Wells
    8. Art Robert Bagley
    9. Pastoral nomads Tim May
    Part II. Trans-Regional and Regional Perspectives:
    10. Western and Central Eurasia Touraj Daryaee
    11. Regional study: Bactria – the crossroads of ancient Eurasia Jeffrey Lerner
    12. The Mediterranean Craig Benjamin and Merry Wiesner-Hanks
    13. Regional study: Athens in the fifth century BCE William Morison
    14. Late antiquity in Europe c.300–900 CE Charles F. Pazdernik
    15. East Asia Charles Holcombe
    16. Regional study: Confucianism and the state Xinzhong Yao
    17. Regional study: exchanges within the silk roads world system Xinru Liu
    18. South Asia Shonaleeka Kaul
    19. Regional study: Pataliputra Shonaleeka Kaul
    20. The Americas Janet Brashler and Erica Begun
    21. Regional study: Chaco culture and the US Southwest Stephen H. Lekson
    22. Australasia and the Pacific Ian McNiven
    23. Africa: states, empires and connections Stanley Burstein
    24. Regional study: trans-Saharan trade Ralph Austen.

  • Editor

    Craig Benjamin, Grand Valley State University, Michigan
    Craig Benjamin is an Associate Professor of History at Frederik J. Meijer Honors College, Grand Valley State University, Michigan (GVSU). At GVSU, he teaches Big History, world history, and East and Central Asian history, to students at all levels, from first-year to postgraduate. He is a frequent guest presenter at conferences worldwide, and the author of numerous published books, chapters and essays on ancient Central Asian history, Big History, and world history. He is co-author (with David Christian and Cynthia Brown) of a Big History textbook – Big History: Between Nothing and Everything (2013). Benjamin has recorded several programs and lecture series for The History Channel, The Teaching Company and Scientific American magazine. He is also a member of the College Board Test Development Committees for both the AP and SAT World History exams; Treasurer of the International Big History Association; and President (2014/15) of the World History Association.

    Contributors

    Craig Benjamin, Sitta von Reden, Ping Yao, Scott Wells, Peter Hunt, Björn Wittrock, Helmuth Schneider, Robert Bagley, Tim May, Touraj Daryaee, Jeffrey Lerner, Merry Wiesner-Hanks, William Morison, Charles F. Pazdernik, Charles Holcombe, Xinzhong Yao, Xinru Liu, Shonaleeka Kaul, Janet Brashler, Erica Begun, Stephen H. Lekson, Ian McNiven, Stanley Burstein, Ralph Austen

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