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American Literature in Transition, 2000–2010

American Literature in Transition, 2000–2010

AUD$154.95 inc GST

Part of American Literature in Transition

Rachel Greenwald Smith, Elda María Román, T. Jackie Cuevas, Adam Kelly, Andrew Hoberek, Kate Marshall, Phillip Maciak, Lee Konstantinou, Daniel Worden, Mitchum Huehls, Georgiana Banita, Stephen J. Burn, Lindsay Thomas, Brian Kim Stefans, Scott Selisker, Jennifer Ashton, Annie McClanahan, Emilio Sauri, Timothy Melley, Janet Fiskio, Sophia Bamert, Matthew Schneider-Mayerson, Jonathan Skinner, Evan Kindley, Loren Glass, Eric Bennett
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  • Date Published: December 2017
  • availability: Available
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781107149298

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  • American Literature in Transition, 2000–2010 illuminates the dynamic transformations that occurred in American literary culture during the first decade of the twenty-first century. The volume is the first major critical collection to address the literature of the 2000s, a decade that saw dramatic changes in digital technology, economics, world affairs, and environmental awareness. Beginning with an introduction that takes stock of the period's major historical, cultural, and literary movements, the volume features accessible essays on a wide range of topics, including genre fiction, the treatment of social networking in literature, climate change fiction, the ascendency of Amazon and online booksellers, 9/11 literature, finance and literature, and the rise of prestige television. Mapping the literary culture of a decade of promise and threat, American Literature in Transition, 2000–2010 provides an invaluable resource on twenty-first century American literature for general readers, students, and scholars alike.

    • Offers a broad account of the literary culture of the 2000s, making it a a useful volume for teaching twenty-first century literature or for scholars needing an overview of the decade's most important developments
    • Organized according to thematic, formal, and institutional clusters, allowing scholars and students to find work on a few major thematic developments of the decade, such as awareness of ecological crisis
    • Chapters are brief, free of jargon, and argument-driven, making it an engaging read for specialists and non-specialists alike
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    Product details

    • Date Published: December 2017
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9781107149298
    • length: 412 pages
    • dimensions: 236 x 158 x 26 mm
    • weight: 0.81kg
    • contains: 5 b/w illus.
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction Rachel Greenwald Smith
    Part I. Formal Transitions:
    1. 'Post'-ethnic form Elda María Román
    2. Gender, sexuality, and new queer forms T. Jackie Cuevas
    3. Formally conventional fiction Adam Kelly
    4. Literary genre fiction Andrew Hoberek
    5. New wave fabulism and hybrid science fictions Kate Marshall
    6. The televisual novel Phillip Maciak
    Part II. The Return of Authenticity:
    7. Neorealist fiction Lee Konstantinou
    8. Memoir Daniel Worden
    9. Historical fiction and the end of history Mitchum Huehls
    10. Literature after 9/11 Georgiana Banita
    11. The neuronovel Stephen J. Burn
    Part III. Digital Revolutions:
    12. Information Lindsay Thomas
    13. Electronic literature Brian Kim Stefans
    14. Social networks Scott Selisker
    15. Conceptual writing Jennifer Ashton
    Part IV. Transnational Currents:
    16. Financialization Annie McClanahan
    17. Borders and migrations Emilio Sauri
    18. War on terror Timothy Melley
    Part V. The Ecological Turn:
    19. New directions in ecocriticism Janet Fiskio and Sophia Bamert
    20. Climate change fiction Matthew Schneider-Mayerson
    21. Ecopoetics Jonathan Skinner
    Part VI. Institutional Shifts:
    22. Little magazines, blogs, and literary media Evan Kindley
    23. Publishing in the age of Amazon Loren Glass
    24. Creative writing, cultural studies, and the university Eric Bennett
    Afterword: the 2000s after 2016 Rachel Greenwald Smith.

  • Editor

    Rachel Greenwald Smith, Saint Louis University, Missouri
    Rachel Greenwald Smith is the author of Affect and American Literature in the Age of Neoliberalism (Cambridge, 2015) and the co-editor, with Mitchum Huehls, of Neoliberalism and Contemporary Literary Culture (2017). She is a recipient of a Ryskamp Research Fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies, and her essays have appeared in American Literature, Modern Fiction Studies, Mediations, Twentieth Century Literature, and The Account. She is Associate Professor of English at Saint Louis University, Missouri.

    Contributors

    Rachel Greenwald Smith, Elda María Román, T. Jackie Cuevas, Adam Kelly, Andrew Hoberek, Kate Marshall, Phillip Maciak, Lee Konstantinou, Daniel Worden, Mitchum Huehls, Georgiana Banita, Stephen J. Burn, Lindsay Thomas, Brian Kim Stefans, Scott Selisker, Jennifer Ashton, Annie McClanahan, Emilio Sauri, Timothy Melley, Janet Fiskio, Sophia Bamert, Matthew Schneider-Mayerson, Jonathan Skinner, Evan Kindley, Loren Glass, Eric Bennett

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