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A History of American Crime Fiction

$88.00 USD

Christopher Raczkowski, Jodi Schorb, Daniel E. Williams, Matthew Warner Osborn, Timothy Helwig, Jeannine Marie DeLombard, Paul Grimstad, Pamela Bedore, Jon Blandford, Ellen Burton Harrington, John Dudley, Malcah Effron, Justus Nieland, Paula Rabinowitz, Frederick Whiting, Susan Elizabeth Sweeney, Michael Millner, James H. Cox, Justin Gifford, Dean DeFino, Jean Murley, Andrew Pepper, Will Scheibel, David Bianculli, Christopher Breu
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  • Date Published: November 2017
  • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • format: Adobe eBook Reader
  • isbn: 9781108548434

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About the Authors
  • A History of American Crime Fiction places crime fiction within a context of aesthetic practices and experiments, intellectual concerns, and historical debates generally reserved for canonical literary history. Toward that end, the book is divided into sections that reflect the periods that commonly organize American literary history, with chapters highlighting crime fiction's reciprocal relationships with early American literature, romanticism, realism, modernism and postmodernism. It surveys everything from 17th-century execution sermons, the detective fiction of Harriet Spofford and T. S. Eliot's The Waste Land, to the films of David Lynch, HBO's The Sopranos, and the podcast Serial, while engaging a wide variety of critical methods. As a result, this book expands crime fiction's significance beyond the boundaries of popular genres and explores the symbiosis between crime fiction and canonical literature that sustains and energizes both.

    • Divided into sections similar to those used when teaching canonical literary history in university English classes, making it useful for instructors of literary historical period based classes and scholars focusing on those periods
    • Includes more extensive treatment of television crime fiction than previous histories, making it of interest non-academic readers
    • Proposes a new view of crime fiction history as intertwined with canonical literary history, appealing to readers interested in both popular fiction forms and literary fiction forms
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    Reviews & endorsements

    'Starting with the Puritans and continuing through to the present day, this collection comprises 25 original essays on American crime fiction, including film and television (The Sopranos and others). Raczkowski (Univ. of South Alabama) goes beyond the usual generic markers of crime fiction …' Choice

    '… this informed, substantive collection does leave us questioning the profiles and line-ups through which we more typically organize its important objects of inquiry. In this respect, the future histories of crime fiction seem well in hand.' Christopher P. Wilson, American Literary History

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    Product details

    • Date Published: November 2017
    • format: Adobe eBook Reader
    • isbn: 9781108548434
    • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction Christopher Raczkowski
    Part I. Early American Era:
    1. From sermon to story: early American crime literature Jodi Schorb and Daniel E. Williams
    2. The theft of authorship: crime narrative in post-revolutionary early American literature Jodi Schorb and Daniel E. Williams
    Part II. Romantic Era:
    3. Crime journalism and the urban Gothic novel Matthew Warner Osborn
    4. Crime and American romanticism Timothy Helwig
    5. The Dark transactions of a Black? Slave narratives in the crime literature tradition Jeannine Marie DeLombard
    6. Edgar Allan Poe and the emergence of the literary detective Paul Grimstad
    Part III. Realist Era:
    7. The rise of the professional detective and the dime detective Pamela Bedore
    8. Home and away: reinvestigating domestic detective fiction Jon Blandford
    9. The rise of the American woman detective: gender and the detective genre in Green, Doyle, and Rinehart Ellen Burton Harrington
    10. Crime, science, realism John Dudley
    Part IV. Modernist Era:
    11. Criminal modernism Christopher Raczkowski
    12. American golden age crime fiction Malcah Effron
    13. Red Harvest: hard-boiled crime fiction and the fate of left populism Justus Nieland
    14. Stateless mothers/motherless states: the femme fatale on the threshold of American citizenship Paula Rabinowitz
    15. One of us: the emergence of the psychopathological protagonist Frederick Whiting
    Part V. Postmodernist Era:
    16. Unusual suspects: American crimes, metaphysical detectives, postmodernist genres Susan Elizabeth Sweeney
    17. Identity politics and crime fiction Michael Millner
    18. American detective fiction and settler colonialism James H. Cox
    19. African American crime and detective fiction Justin Gifford
    20. Criminal family drama before and after The Sopranos Dean DeFino
    21. Making murderers: the evolution of true crime Jean Murley
    22. Spy narratives in post 9/11 American culture Andrew Pepper
    23. Film noir and neo-noir Will Scheibel
    24. Crime fiction television David Bianculli
    25. Dead reckonings: theoretical and critical approaches to detective fiction Christopher Breu.

  • Editor

    Chris Raczkowski, University of South Alabama
    Chris Raczkowski is associate professor of English at the University of South Alabama. His work on American literature and culture has appeared in numerous academic journals and anthologies and he is currently at work on a manuscript on modernism and crime titled, sensibly enough, Criminal Modernism (forthcoming).

    Contributors

    Christopher Raczkowski, Jodi Schorb, Daniel E. Williams, Matthew Warner Osborn, Timothy Helwig, Jeannine Marie DeLombard, Paul Grimstad, Pamela Bedore, Jon Blandford, Ellen Burton Harrington, John Dudley, Malcah Effron, Justus Nieland, Paula Rabinowitz, Frederick Whiting, Susan Elizabeth Sweeney, Michael Millner, James H. Cox, Justin Gifford, Dean DeFino, Jean Murley, Andrew Pepper, Will Scheibel, David Bianculli, Christopher Breu

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