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Logical Modalities from Aristotle to Carnap
The Story of Necessity

$26.00 USD

Max Cresswell, Edwin Mares, Adriane Rini, Marko Malink, Robin Smith, Vanessa de Harven, Paul Thom, Chris Martin, Calvin G. Normore, Jack MacIntosh, Peter Anstey, Brandon C. Look, Jonathan Westphal, Nicholas Stang, Catherine Legg, Cheryl Misak
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  • Date Published: September 2016
  • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • format: Adobe eBook Reader
  • isbn: 9781316760819

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  • Interest in the metaphysics and logic of possible worlds goes back at least as far as Aristotle, but few books address the history of these important concepts. This volume offers new essays on the theories about the logical modalities (necessity and possibility) held by leading philosophers from Aristotle in ancient Greece to Rudolf Carnap in the twentieth century. The story begins with an illuminating discussion of Aristotle's views on the connection between logic and metaphysics, continues through the Stoic and mediaeval (including Arabic) traditions, and then moves to the early modern period with particular attention to Locke and Leibniz. The views of Kant, Peirce, C. I. Lewis and Carnap complete the volume. Many of the essays illuminate the connection between the historical figures studied, and recent or current work in the philosophy of modality. The result is a rich and wide-ranging picture of the history of the logical modalities.

    • An approachable introduction to the history of the philosophy of modality
    • Provides important source material for specialists as it is written by leading experts in the field, focusing closely on primary texts
    • Outlines a 'back to basics' foundation for philosophical discussion about modality through its focus on the interpretation of historical texts
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    Product details

    • Date Published: September 2016
    • format: Adobe eBook Reader
    • isbn: 9781316760819
    • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction Max Cresswell, Edwin Mares and Adriane Rini
    1. Aristotle on the necessity of the consequent Adriane Rini
    2. Aristotle on one-sided possibility Marko Malink
    3. Why does Aristotle need a modal syllogistic? Robin Smith
    4. Necessity, possibility and determinism in Stoic thought Vanessa de Harven
    5. Necessity in Avicenna and the Arabic tradition Paul Thom
    6. Modality without the Prior Analytics: early twelfth-century accounts of modal propositions Chris Martin
    7. Ockham and the foundations of modal theory in the fourteenth century Calvin G. Normore
    8. Theological and scientific applications of the notion of necessity in the mediaeval and early modern periods Jack MacIntosh
    9. Locke and the problem of necessity in early modern philosophy Peter Anstey
    10. Leibniz's theories of necessity Brandon C. Look
    11. Leibniz and the lucky proof Jonathan Westphal
    12. Divine necessity and Kant's modal categories Nicholas Stang
    13. Charles Sanders Peirce on necessity Catherine Legg and Cheryl Misak
    14. The development of C. I. Lewis's philosophy of modal logic Edwin Mares
    15. Carnap's modal predicate logic Max Cresswell.

  • Editors

    Max Cresswell, Victoria University of Wellington
    Max Cresswell taught philosophy at Victoria University of Wellington from 1963 to 1999, and has taught there again part-time since 2009. He has published over 150 articles and eleven books, including three widely used texts on modal logic with G. E. Hughes, and most recently, with Adriane Rini, The World-Time Parallel (Cambridge, 2012).

    Edwin Mares, Victoria University of Wellington
    Edwin Mares is Professor of Philosophy at Victoria University of Wellington. His publications include Relevant Logic: A Philosophical Interpretation (Cambridge, 2004), A Priori (2011), and, with Stuart Brock, Realism and Anti-Realism (2007).

    Adriane Rini, Massey University, Auckland
    Adriane Rini is Associate Professor of Philosophy at Massey University, New Zealand. She is the author of Aristotle's Modal Proofs (2011) and, with Max Cresswell, The World-Time Parallel (Cambridge, 2012).

    Contributors

    Max Cresswell, Edwin Mares, Adriane Rini, Marko Malink, Robin Smith, Vanessa de Harven, Paul Thom, Chris Martin, Calvin G. Normore, Jack MacIntosh, Peter Anstey, Brandon C. Look, Jonathan Westphal, Nicholas Stang, Catherine Legg, Cheryl Misak

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