Skip to content
Cart 
Register Sign in Wishlist

Clan Politics and Regime Transition in Central Asia

AUD$69.95 inc GST

  • Date Published: June 2009
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9780521114660

AUD$ 69.95 inc GST
Paperback

Add to cart Add to wishlist

Other available formats:
Hardback, eBook


Looking for an inspection copy?

Please email academicmarketing@cambridge.edu.au to enquire about an inspection copy of this book

Description
Product filter button
Description
Contents
Resources
Courses
About the Authors
  • This book is a study of the role of clan networks in Central Asia from the early twentieth century through 2004. Exploring the social, economic, and historical roots of clans, and their political role and political transformation in the Soviet and post-Soviet periods, it argues that clans are informal political actors that are critical to understanding politics in this region. The book demonstrates that the Soviet system was far less successful in transforming and controlling Central Asian society, and in its policy of eradicating clan identities, than has often been assumed. In order to understand Central Asian politics and their economies, scholars and policy makers must take into account the powerful role of these informal groups, how they adapt and change over time, and how they may constrain or undermine democratization in this strategic region.

    • No other book explicitly offers an empirical and theoretical study of clans; this book also integrates a multi-case comparative approach
    • This book is the first major study of the Soviet and post-Soviet politics and regime transition/failed democratization in Central Asia
    • The book is based on many years of in-depth field research between 1994 and 2004, in both urban and rural Central Asia
    Read more

    Customer reviews

    Not yet reviewed

    Be the first to review

    Review was not posted due to profanity

    ×

    , create a review

    (If you're not , sign out)

    Please enter the right captcha value
    Please enter a star rating.
    Your review must be a minimum of 12 words.

    How do you rate this item?

    ×

    Product details

    • Date Published: June 2009
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9780521114660
    • length: 400 pages
    • dimensions: 229 x 152 x 23 mm
    • weight: 0.59kg
    • contains: 2 b/w illus. 19 tables
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    List of Tables and Figures
    Preface
    Acknowledgements
    Note on Transliteration
    1. An introduction to political development and transition in Central Asia
    2. Clan politics and regime transition in Central Asia: a framework for understanding politics in clan-based societies
    3. Colonialism to Stalinism: the dynamic between clans and the State
    4. The informal politics of Central Asia from Brezhnev through Gorbachev
    5. Transition from above or below? (1990–1991)
    6. Central Asia's transition (1991–1995)
    7. Central Asia's regime transformation (1995–2004): Part I
    8. Central Asia's regime transformation (1995–2004): Part II
    9. Positive and negative political trajectories in clan-based societies
    10. Conclusion
    Epilogue
    Appendix
    Index.

  • Author

    Kathleen Collins, University of Notre Dame, Indiana
    Kathleen Collins is Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Notre Dame and Faculty Fellow at the Kellogg Institute for International Studies. She has published articles in World Politics, Comparative Politics, the Journal of Democracy, and several edited volumes. She has received grants from the MacArthur Foundation, the United States Institute for Peace, IREX, and the National Council for Russian, East European and Eurasian Research, among others. Dr Collins was named a Carnegie Scholar in 2003 for her research. She has been conducting research throughout Central Asia for eleven years, since 1994.

Sign In

Please sign in to access your account

Cancel

Not already registered? Create an account now. ×

Sorry, this resource is locked

Please register or sign in to request access. If you are having problems accessing these resources please email lecturers@cambridge.org

Register Sign in
Please note that this file is password protected. You will be asked to input your password on the next screen.

» Proceed

You are now leaving the Cambridge University Press website. Your eBook purchase and download will be completed by our partner www.ebooks.com. Please see the permission section of the www.ebooks.com catalogue page for details of the print & copy limits on our eBooks.

Continue ×

Continue ×

Continue ×

Find content that relates to you

Join us online

This site uses cookies to improve your experience. Read more Close

Are you sure you want to delete your account?

This cannot be undone.

Cancel

Thank you for your feedback which will help us improve our service.

If you requested a response, we will make sure to get back to you shortly.

×
Please fill in the required fields in your feedback submission.
×