Skip to content
Register Sign in Wishlist
Look Inside Transformational Grammar as a Theory of Language Acquisition

Transformational Grammar as a Theory of Language Acquisition
A Study in the Empirical Conceptual and Methodological Foundations of Contemporary Linguistics

£25.99

Part of Cambridge Studies in Linguistics

  • Date Published: June 1973
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9780521097987

£ 25.99
Paperback

Add to cart Add to wishlist

Looking for an inspection copy?

This title is not currently available on inspection

Description
Product filter button
Description
Contents
Resources
Courses
About the Authors
  • The revolution in linguistic thought associated with the name of Professor Noam Chomsky centres on the theory of transformational generation, especially in grammar. This book subjects the main theory and some of its applications to a searching critique. It finds the theory in some places circular, in general descriptively inadequate, but above all aprioristic and dangerously unempirical. Professor Derwing writes as a linguist particularly interested in the psychology of language acquisition, and conscious that the TGG model starts from assumptions about the mind and linguistic universals which dictate the form and the consequences of the argument. They strike Professor Derwing as arbitrary and merely formal, and as contradicting basic scientific mental habits. In brief, Professor Derwing disputes that TGG exemplifies proper empirical scientific inquiry; that something like a TGG is part of the output of normal language acquisition; or that TGG provides a valid heuristic for psychological investigation. He argues therefore for a more experimental approach if we are actually to discover how language is acquired.

    Customer reviews

    Not yet reviewed

    Be the first to review

    Review was not posted due to profanity

    ×

    , create a review

    (If you're not , sign out)

    Please enter the right captcha value
    Please enter a star rating.
    Your review must be a minimum of 12 words.

    How do you rate this item?

    ×

    Product details

    • Date Published: June 1973
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9780521097987
    • length: 360 pages
    • dimensions: 229 x 152 x 20 mm
    • weight: 0.53kg
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Preface
    Part I. Background:
    1. Introduction
    2. Some central aspects of the 'Chomskyan revolution' in American linguistics
    3. On the nature of language acquisition
    Part II. Linguistic Metatheory:
    4. Some problems in phonological description
    5. 'Explanation' and 'naturalness' in TGG
    6. Some process-oriented counterproposals
    Part III. Methodological and Conceptual Foundations:
    7. Chomsky's 'revolution' reconsidered
    8. On 'competence' and 'performance'
    9. Towards a redefinition of linguistic research
    Bibliography
    Index.

  • Author

    Bruce L. Derwing

Sign In

Please sign in to access your account

Cancel

Not already registered? Create an account now. ×

Sorry, this resource is locked

Please register or sign in to request access. If you are having problems accessing these resources please email lecturers@cambridge.org

Register Sign in
Please note that this file is password protected. You will be asked to input your password on the next screen.

» Proceed

You are now leaving the Cambridge University Press website. Your eBook purchase and download will be completed by our partner www.ebooks.com. Please see the permission section of the www.ebooks.com catalogue page for details of the print & copy limits on our eBooks.

Continue ×

Continue ×

Continue ×

Find content that relates to you

Join us online

This site uses cookies to improve your experience. Read more Close

Are you sure you want to delete your account?

This cannot be undone.

Cancel

Thank you for your feedback which will help us improve our service.

If you requested a response, we will make sure to get back to you shortly.

×
Please fill in the required fields in your feedback submission.
×