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The Cambridge Companion to Virgil

$34.00 USD

Part of Cambridge Companions to Literature

Charles Martindale, Colin Burrow, Duncan F. Kennedy, R. J. Tarrant, Don Fowler, M. J. H. Liversidge, William Batstone, Elena Theodorakopoulos, James E. G. Zetzel, Susanna Morton Braund, Joseph Farrell, James J. O'Hara, Alessandro Barchiesi, Andrew Laird, Ellen Oliensis, Philip Hardie, Fiona Cox
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  • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • format: Adobe eBook Reader
  • isbn: 9781107480452

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About the Authors
  • Virgil became a school author in his own lifetime and the centre of the Western canon for the next 1800 years, exerting a major influence on European literature, art, and politics. This Companion is designed as an indispensable guide for anyone seeking a fuller understanding of an author critical to so many disciplines. It consists of essays by seventeen scholars from Britain, the USA, Ireland and Italy which offer a range of different perspectives both traditional and innovative on Virgil's works, and a renewed sense of why Virgil matters today. The Companion is divided into four main sections, focussing on reception, genre, context, and form. This ground-breaking book not only provides a wealth of material for an informed reading but also offers sophisticated insights which point to the shape of Virgilian scholarship and criticism to come.

    • Contributions by leading scholars from Britain, the USA, Ireland and Italy
    • Refreshing approach to Virgil
    • Emphasis on the reception of Virgil in later centuries - hence appeal beyond the classical market
    • All essays newly commissioned for this Companion
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    Reviews & endorsements

    ' … highly successful for both a specialist and non-specialist audience. Classical scholars will find much to think about … and their students will find [this] invaluable.' The Times Literary Supplement

    'Awareness of the importance of Virgil's reception is growing among Latinist, thanks in no small measure to the work of the editor of The Cambridge Companion to Virgil, Charles Martindale, and the fruitful results of this awareness are regularly on display in the collection … Classical scholars will find much to think about … and their students will find it invaluable. [The] book contains chapters that will launch a thousand essays. One may only hope that non-classicists will also be encouraged to explore the worlds of Virgil' The Times Literary Supplement

    ' … not only an important new resource for those approaching Virgil for the first time, but it also affords a useful overview of the current state of Virgilian research … I can recommend this book to anyone interested in Virgil.' Classics Ireland

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    Product details

    • format: Adobe eBook Reader
    • isbn: 9781107480452
    • contains: 25 b/w illus.
    • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • Table of Contents

    List of illustrations
    Preface
    1. Introduction: 'The classic of all Europe' Charles Martindale
    Part I. Translation and Reception:
    2. Virgil in English translation Colin Burrow
    3. Modern receptions and their interpretative implications Duncan F. Kennedy
    4. Aspects of Virgil's reception in Antiquity R. J. Tarrant
    5. The Virgil commentary of Servius Don Fowler
    6. Virgils, from Dante to Milton Colin Burrow
    7. Virgil in art M. J. H. Liversidge
    Part II. Genre and Poetic Career:
    8. Green politics: the Eclogues Charles Martindale
    9. Virgilian didaxis: value and meaning in the Georgics William Batstone
    10. Virgilian epic Duncan F. Kennedy
    11. Closure: the Book of Virgil Elena Theodorakopoulos
    Part III. Contexts of Production:
    12. Poetry and power: Virgil's poetry in contemporary context R. J. Tarrant
    13. Rome and its traditions James E. G. Zetzel
    14. Virgil and the cosmos: religious and philosophical ideas Susanna Morton Braund
    15. The Virgilian intertext Joseph Farrell
    Part IV. Contents and Forms:
    16. Virgil's style James J. O'Hara
    17. Virgilian narrative: (a) Storytelling Don Fowler
    (b) Ecphrasis Alessandro Barchiesi
    18. Approaching characterisation in Virgil Andrew Laird
    19. Sons and lovers: sexuality and gender in Virgil's poetry Ellen Oliensis
    20. Virgil and tragedy Philip Hardie
    21. Envoi: the death of Virgil Fiona Cox
    Dateline
    Index.

  • Instructors have used or reviewed this title for the following courses

    • Epic, Translation, and Imitation in the Early Modern Period
    • Heroes and Epics
    • Introduction to Latin Poetry
    • Virgil
  • Editor

    Charles Martindale, University of Bristol

    Contributors

    Charles Martindale, Colin Burrow, Duncan F. Kennedy, R. J. Tarrant, Don Fowler, M. J. H. Liversidge, William Batstone, Elena Theodorakopoulos, James E. G. Zetzel, Susanna Morton Braund, Joseph Farrell, James J. O'Hara, Alessandro Barchiesi, Andrew Laird, Ellen Oliensis, Philip Hardie, Fiona Cox

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