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Electrons and Phonons in Semiconductor Multilayers

2nd Edition

£41.99

  • Date Published: August 2014
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9781107424579

£ 41.99
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About the Authors
  • Advances in nanotechnology have generated semiconductor structures that are only a few molecular layers thick, and this has important consequences for the physics of electrons and phonons in such structures. This book describes in detail how confinement of electrons and phonons in quantum wells and wires affects the physical properties of the semiconductor. This second edition contains four new chapters on spin relaxation, based on recent theoretical research; the hexagonal wurtzite lattice; nitride structures, whose novel properties stem from their spontaneous electric polarization; and terahertz sources, which includes an account of the controversies that surrounded the concepts of Bloch oscillations and Wannier-Stark states. The book is unique in describing the microscopic theory of optical phonons, the radical change in their nature due to confinement, and how they interact with electrons. It will interest graduate students and researchers working in semiconductor physics.

    • Four new chapters - spin relaxation, the hexagonal wurtzite lattice, nitride structures, and terahertz sources
    • Describes how confinement of electrons and phonons in quantum wells and wires affects the physical properties of the semiconductor
    • Unique in describing the microscopic theory of optical phonons, their change in nature due to confinement, and their interaction with electrons
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    Reviews & endorsements

    Review from the first edition: 'Electrons and Phonons in Semiconductor Multilayers achieves its purpose commendably and fills a gap in the market. The book is well-produced, with a good index, and is reasonably priced.' A. M. Fox, Optics and Photonics News

    Review from the first edition: '… a specialist's vade mecum, including an immense amount of valuable detail.' Peter J. Price, Physics Today

    'The reviewed book is one of those rare pleasant events. … The book should be of interest to those dealing with the investigations and applications of low-dimensional semiconductor structures.' Yuri G. Peisakhovich, Materials Research Bulletin

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    Product details

    • Edition: 2nd Edition
    • Date Published: August 2014
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9781107424579
    • length: 422 pages
    • dimensions: 244 x 170 x 22 mm
    • weight: 0.67kg
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction
    1. Simple models of the electron-phonon interaction
    2. Quantum confinement of carriers
    3. Quasicontinuum theory of lattice vibrations
    4. Bulk vibratory modes in an isotropic continuum
    5. Optical modes in a quantum well
    6. Superlattice modes
    7. Optical modes in various structures
    8. Electron-phonon interaction in a quantum well
    9. Other scattering mechanisms
    10. Quantum screening
    11. The electron distribution function
    12. Spin relaxation
    13. Electrons and phonons in the Wurtzite lattice
    14. Nitride heterostructures
    15. Terahertz sources
    References
    Index.

  • Author

    B. K. Ridley, University of Essex
    B. K. Ridley is Professor Emeritus in the Department of Computing and Electronic Systems at the University of Essex, Colchester. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society, and was awarded the Paul Dirac Prize and Medal in 2001 by the Institute of Physics.

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