Skip to content
Register Sign in Wishlist

Algebraic Methods in Unstable Homotopy Theory

$160.00

Part of New Mathematical Monographs

  • Date Published: February 2010
  • availability: Available
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9780521760379

$ 160.00
Hardback

Add to cart Add to wishlist

Other available formats:
eBook


Looking for an evaluation copy?

This title is not currently available for evaluation. However, if you are interested in the title for your course we can consider offering an evaluation copy. To register your interest please contact asiamktg@cambridge.org providing details of the course you are teaching.

Description
Product filter button
Description
Contents
Resources
Courses
About the Authors
  • The most modern and thorough treatment of unstable homotopy theory available. The focus is on those methods from algebraic topology which are needed in the presentation of results, proven by Cohen, Moore, and the author, on the exponents of homotopy groups. The author introduces various aspects of unstable homotopy theory, including: homotopy groups with coefficients; localization and completion; the Hopf invariants of Hilton, James, and Toda; Samelson products; homotopy Bockstein spectral sequences; graded Lie algebras; differential homological algebra; and the exponent theorems concerning the homotopy groups of spheres and Moore spaces. This book is suitable for a course in unstable homotopy theory, following a first course in homotopy theory. It is also a valuable reference for both experts and graduate students wishing to enter the field.

    • Methods are introduced one-by-one in chapters that are largely self-contained
    • Suitable as a course text and also a valuable reference for experts and graduate students wishing to enter the field
    • Contains over 270 exercises
    Read more

    Reviews & endorsements

    'It is very well written and organized, as would be expected of the author, who is renowned for an excellent expository style … the book could, and should, be used as a text for students aiming to do research in unstable homotopy theory. By the end of a thorough reading, a student would be well grounded in a suite of contemporary methods and would be ready to tackle research problems. the book's comprehensive nature also means that it is a wonderful reference for expects in the area.' Bulletin of the London Mathematical Society

    '… provides a new generation of topologists with a readable and workmanlike collection of important techniques and results …' Mathematical Reviews

    See more reviews

    Customer reviews

    Not yet reviewed

    Be the first to review

    Review was not posted due to profanity

    ×

    , create a review

    (If you're not , sign out)

    Please enter the right captcha value
    Please enter a star rating.
    Your review must be a minimum of 12 words.

    How do you rate this item?

    ×

    Product details

    • Date Published: February 2010
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9780521760379
    • length: 574 pages
    • dimensions: 234 x 162 x 35 mm
    • weight: 0.93kg
    • contains: 275 exercises
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Preface
    Introduction
    1. Homotopy groups with coefficients
    2. A general theory of localization
    3. Fibre extensions of squares and the Peterson-Stein formula
    4. Hilton-Hopf invariants and the EHP sequence
    5. James-Hopf invariants and Toda-Hopf invariants
    6. Samelson products
    7. Bockstein spectral sequences
    8. Lie algebras and universal enveloping algebras
    9. Applications of graded Lie algebras
    10. Differential homological algebra
    11. Odd primary exponent theorems
    12. Differential homological algebra of classifying spaces
    Bibliography
    Index.

  • Author

    Joseph Neisendorfer, University of Rochester, New York
    Joseph Neisendorfer is Professor Emeritus in the Department of Mathematics at the University of Rochester, New York.

Sign In

Please sign in to access your account

Cancel

Not already registered? Create an account now. ×

Sorry, this resource is locked

Please register or sign in to request access. If you are having problems accessing these resources please email lecturers@cambridge.org

Register Sign in
Please note that this file is password protected. You will be asked to input your password on the next screen.

» Proceed

You are now leaving the Cambridge University Press website. Your eBook purchase and download will be completed by our partner www.ebooks.com. Please see the permission section of the www.ebooks.com catalogue page for details of the print & copy limits on our eBooks.

Continue ×

Continue ×

Continue ×

Find content that relates to you

Join us online

This site uses cookies to improve your experience. Read more Close

Are you sure you want to delete your account?

This cannot be undone.

Cancel

Thank you for your feedback which will help us improve our service.

If you requested a response, we will make sure to get back to you shortly.

×
Please fill in the required fields in your feedback submission.
×