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Getting and Spending

Getting and Spending
European and American Consumer Societies in the Twentieth Century

£24.99

Part of Publications of the German Historical Institute

Susan Strasser, Charles McGovern, Matthias Judt, Kathryn Kish Sklar, Victoria de Grazia, Roland Marchand, Lizabeth Cohen, George Lipsitz, Daniel Horowitz, André Steiner, Kurt Möser, Susan Porter Benson, Nancy Reagin, Ina Merkel, Michael Wildt, Stephen Kline, Christian Pfister, Fath Davis Ruffins, James Livingston, Ulrich Wyrwa, Jackson Lears
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  • Date Published: December 1998
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9780521626941

£ 24.99
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About the Authors
  • The developing history of consumption is not so much a separate field, as a prism through which many aspects of social and political life may be viewed. The essays in this collection represent a variety of approaches in Europe and America; yet their commonalities suggest recent directions in the scholarship, raising such themes as consumption and democracy, the development of a global economy, the role of the state, the centrality of consumption to Cold War politics, the importance of the Second World War as a historical divide, the language of consumption, the contexts of locality, race, ethnicity, gender, and class, and the environmental consequences of twentieth-century consumer society. Implicitly, and sometimes explicitly, they explore the role of the historian as social, political, and moral critic. The essays discuss products, corporate strategies, government policies, and ideas about consumption. Unlike other studies of twentieth-century consumption, this book provides international comparisons.

    • Well-known authors who defined the field of consumer history
    • Provides international comparisons of twentieth century consumption
    • Considers consumption-related issues from a variety of perspectives
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    Product details

    • Date Published: December 1998
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9780521626941
    • length: 492 pages
    • dimensions: 229 x 152 x 28 mm
    • weight: 0.72kg
    • contains: 19 b/w illus. 6 tables
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Preface
    Introduction
    Part I. Politics, Markets, and the State:
    1. The consumers' White Label campaign of the National Consumers' League, 1898–1918
    2. Democracy and political identity in the consumer society
    3. Changing consumption Regimes in Europe, 1930–1970
    4. Consumer research as public relations: General Motors in the 1930s
    5. The New Deal State and the making of citizen consumers
    6. Consumer spending as state Project: yesterday's solutions and today's problems
    7. The Emigré as celebrant of American consumer culture: George Katona and Ernest Dichter
    8. Dissolution of the 'dictatorship over needs'? consumer behavior and economic reform in East Germany in the 1960s
    Part II. Everyday Life:
    9. World War I and the creation of desire for cars in Germany
    10. Gender, generation, and consumption in the United States: working-class families in the interwar period
    11. Comparing apples and oranges: housewives and the politics of consumption in interwar Germany
    12. 'The convenience is out of this world': the garbage disposer and American consumer culture
    13. Consumer culture in the GDR, or how the struggle for antimodernity was lost on the battleground of consumer culture
    14. Changes in consumption as social practice in West Germany during the 1950s
    15. Reshaping shopping environments: the competition between the city of Boston and its suburbs
    16. Toys, socialization, and the commodification of play
    17. The 'syndrome of the 1950s' in Switzerland: cheap energy, mass consumption, and the environment
    18. Reflecting on Ethnic Imagery in the Landscape of commerce, 1945–1975
    Part III. History and Theory:
    19. Modern subjectivity and consumer culture
    20. Consumption and consumer society: a contribution to the history of ideas
    21. Reconsidering abundance: a plea for ambiguity.

  • Editors

    Susan Strasser

    Charles McGovern, Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC

    Matthias Judt, Martin Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenburg, Germany

    Contributors

    Susan Strasser, Charles McGovern, Matthias Judt, Kathryn Kish Sklar, Victoria de Grazia, Roland Marchand, Lizabeth Cohen, George Lipsitz, Daniel Horowitz, André Steiner, Kurt Möser, Susan Porter Benson, Nancy Reagin, Ina Merkel, Michael Wildt, Stephen Kline, Christian Pfister, Fath Davis Ruffins, James Livingston, Ulrich Wyrwa, Jackson Lears

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