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Case Studies in Movement Disorders

Case Studies in Movement Disorders
Common and Uncommon Presentations

$54.00 USD

Part of Case Studies in Neurology

Florian Brugger, Kailash P. Bhatia, Roberto Erro, Christos Koros, Leonidas Stefanis, Maria Stamelou, Pedro Barbosa, Helen Ling, Eduardo De Pablo-Fernandez, Janice Holton, Thomas Warner, Tamas Revesz, Stephanie T. Hirschbichler, Paolo Barone, David S. Lynch, Zane Jaunmuktane, Henry Houlden, Christos Ganos, Davina J. Hensman Moss, Sarah J. Tabrizi, Elena Antelmi, Bettina Balint, Carla Cordivari, Amit Batla, George Dervenoulas
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  • Date Published: May 2017
  • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • format: Adobe eBook Reader
  • isbn: 9781108166850
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  • Drawing on the expertise of an international team of authors, Case Studies in Movement Disorders is a compilation of illustrative cases, demonstrating a step-by-step approach to diagnosing and managing these complex conditions. An extensive collection of over sixty videos shows both common and uncommon presentations of a wide range of movement disorders, and the accompanying text guides readers systematically through the clinical history, examination and investigation findings, and diagnosis, and finally discusses the clinical issues raised. Both surgical and pharmacological management options are presented, helping readers understand some of the controversies involved in treatment. The cases are drawn from all of the major groups of movement disorders: ataxia, chorea, dystonia, myoclonus, parkinsonism, tics, and tremor. This will be invaluable for both neurologists in training and more experienced professionals seeking to develop their diagnostic skills, especially when faced with uncommon conditions or uncommon manifestations of common disorders.

    • Draws on the experience of a global team of experts to cover a wide range of cases
    • Illustrative videos are on an accompanying website, helping readers to effectively visualize the presenting symptoms
    • The step by step approach to common and uncommon cases helps to build and reinforce diagnostic skills
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    Customer reviews

    22nd Aug 2017 by MarianthiBr

    An Excellent book in Movement Disorders containing interesting case-studies. All Video Links are working properly.

    22nd Dec 2018 by WaseemAnjum

    I bought this book, kindle version, but dont know how to get access to videos. Disappointed.

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    Product details

    • Date Published: May 2017
    • format: Adobe eBook Reader
    • isbn: 9781108166850
    • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • Table of Contents

    List of contributors
    List of abbreviations
    Section 1. Parkinsonism:
    1. Parkinson disease
    2. Nonmotor Parkinson disease
    3. Isolated lower limb dystonia at onset of Parkin disease
    4. Parkinson's disease associated with SCNA mutations
    5. Steele–Richardson–Olszewski syndrome
    6. PSP-parkinsonism
    7. Corticobasal degeneration
    8. MSA – parkinsonian variant
    9. Prominent freezing of gait and speech disturbances due to Fahr disease
    10. A (familial) PSP look-alike
    11. Parkinsonian syndrome and sunflower cataracts: Wilson's disease
    12. Classic PD-like rest tremor in FTDP-17 due to a MAPT mutation
    13. Progressive parkinsonism with falls and supranuclear gaze palsy
    14. Very early onset parkinsonism
    15. Parkinsonism due to CSF1R mutation
    Section 2. Dystonia:
    16. Early-onset generalized dystonia: DYT1
    17. Early-onset jerky dystonia: an uncommon phenotype of DYT1
    18. Early-onset generalized dystonia with cranio-cervical involvement: DYT6
    19. Autosomal recessive isolated generalized dystonia: DYT2
    20. Dopa-responsive dystonia
    21. A complicated dopa-responsive dystonia: tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency
    22. Early onset generalized dystonia and macrocephaly: Glutaric Aciduria type 1
    23. PKAN misdiagnosed as 'progressive delayed-onset postanoxic dystonia'
    24. Oromandibular dystonia and freezing of gait: a novel presentation of neuroferritinopathy
    25. Generalized dystonia with oromandibular involvement and self-mutilations: Lesch-Nyhan syndrome
    26. Dystonia complicated by pyramidal signs, parkinsonism and cognitive impairment: HSP11
    27. H-ABC syndrome
    28. Dystonic opisthotonus
    29. Delayed-onset dystonia after lightning strike
    Section 3. Tics:
    30. Gilles de la Tourette syndrome
    31. Secondary tic disorders: Huntington disease
    32. Multiple hyperkinesias: tics and paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia
    33. Functional tic disorders
    Section 4. Chorea:
    34. Huntington disease
    35. Generalized chorea with oromandibular involvement and tongue biting
    36. A Huntington disease look-alike: SCA17
    37. A newly recognized HD-phenocopy associated with C9orf72 expansion
    38. Persistent chorea due to anticholinergics in DYT6
    39. Dyskinesia without levodopa: long-term follow-up of mesencephalic transplant in PD
    40. Benign hereditary chorea
    41. Another cause of benign hereditary chorea
    Section 5. Tremor:
    42. Essential tremor
    43. Rest tremor and scans without evidence of dopaminergic deficit (SWEDD)
    44. Neuropathic tremor
    45. A treatable disorder misdiagnosed as ET
    46. Thalamic tremor
    47. Shaking on standing: orthostatic tremor
    48. Palatal tremor
    49. Dystonic tremor and progressive ataxia
    50. Bilateral Holmes tremor in multiple sclerosis
    51. Primary writing tremor
    Section 6. Myoclonus:
    52. A case of 'essential' myoclonus
    53. Ramsey Hunt syndrome and Unverricht–Lundborg disease
    54. North Sea myoclonus due to GOSR2 mutations
    55. Ramsay Hunt syndrome and coeliac disease
    56. Asymmetric myoclonus and apraxia: corticobasal syndromep
    57. Rapidly progressive cognitive regression and myoclonus
    58. Familial cortical 'tremor'
    59. Prominent myoclonus and parkinsonism
    60. Axial myoclonus of uncertain origin
    Section 7. Ataxia:
    61. Slowly progressive unsteadiness and double vision
    62. Cerebellar ataxia with urinary incontinence: MSA-C
    63. Progressive ataxia, tremor, autonomic dysfunction and cognitive impairment
    64. Sensory ataxic neuropathy with dysarthria and ophthalmoparesis (SANDO) syndrome
    65. Ataxia telangiectasia without ataxia
    66. Anti-Yo related ataxia misdiagnosed as multiple system atrophy
    67. Late onset spinocerebellar ataxia
    68. Ataxia with splenomegaly: Niemann–Pick disease type C.

  • Resources for

    Case Studies in Movement Disorders

    Kailash P. Bhatia, Roberto Erro, Maria Stamelou

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  • Authors

    Kailash P. Bhatia, Institute of Neurology, University College London
    Kailash Bhatia is a Professor of Clinical Neurology in the Sobell Department of Motor Neuroscience and Movement Disorders at the Institute of Neurology, University College London and an Honorary Consultant Neurologist at the affiliated National Hospital for Neurology, London.

    Roberto Erro, Università degli Studi di Salerno, Italy
    Roberto Erro is Assistant Professor of Neurology in the Department of Neurology, Università degli Studi di Salerno, Italy and Honorary Research Associate in the Institute of Neurology, Sobell Department of Movement, University College London.

    Maria Stamelou, University of Athens, Greece
    Maria Stamelou is Assistant Professor of Neurology in the Department of Neurology, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Germany, Honorary Research Associatein the Sobell Department of Motor Neuroscience and Movement Disorders at the Institute of Neurology, University College London, and Head of Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders Department at HYGEIA Hospital, Athens.

    Contributors

    Florian Brugger, Kailash P. Bhatia, Roberto Erro, Christos Koros, Leonidas Stefanis, Maria Stamelou, Pedro Barbosa, Helen Ling, Eduardo De Pablo-Fernandez, Janice Holton, Thomas Warner, Tamas Revesz, Stephanie T. Hirschbichler, Paolo Barone, David S. Lynch, Zane Jaunmuktane, Henry Houlden, Christos Ganos, Davina J. Hensman Moss, Sarah J. Tabrizi, Elena Antelmi, Bettina Balint, Carla Cordivari, Amit Batla, George Dervenoulas

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