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Research on Judgment and Decision Making

Research on Judgment and Decision Making
Currents, Connections, and Controversies

£72.00

textbook

Part of Cambridge Series on Judgment and Decision Making

William M. Goldstein, Robin M. Hogarth, Eldar Shafir, Itamar Simonson, Amos Tversky, Gerd Gigerenzer, Ulrich Hoffrage, Heinz Kleinbolting, Kenneth R. Hammond, Robert M. Hamm, Janet Grassia, Tamra Pearson, John W. Payne, James R. Bettman, Eric J. Johnson, Joshua Klayman, Young-Won Ha, Brian J. Gibbs, Craig R. M. McKenzie, Margaret A. Marquis, Daniel Kahneman, Carol A. Varey, Colin F. Camerer, George Loewenstein, Richard H. Thaler, Robyn M. Dawes, Alphons J. C. van de Kragt, John M. Orbell, Daniel Kahneman, Jackie Snell, Amos Tversky, Dale Griffin, Reid Hastie, Bernadette Park, Nancy Pennington, Robin M. Hogarth, Howard Kunreuther, Alice M. Isen, Michael E. Doherty , Berndt Brehmer, Willem A. Wagenaar, Gideon Keren, Sarah Lichtenstein, Elke U. Weber, Edward E. Smith, Cristopher Langston, Richard E. Nisbett, Philip E. Tetlock, Lola L. Lopes
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  • Date Published: August 1997
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9780521483346

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  • This book offers an overview of recent research on the psychology of judgment and decision making, the field which investigates the processes by which people draw conclusions, reach evaluations, and make choices. An introductory, historically oriented chapter provides a way of viewing the overall structure of the field, its recent trends, and its possible directions. Subsequent sections present significant recent papers by prominent researchers, organized to reveal the currents, connections, and controversies that animate the field. Current trends in the field are illustrated with papers from ongoing streams of research. The papers on 'connections' explore memory, explanation, and argument, affect, attitudes, and motivation. Finally, a section on 'controversies' presents problem representation, domain knowledge, content specificity, rule-governed versus rule-described behavior, and proposals for radical departures and new beginnings in the field.

    • Offers an insider's view of the field in a major introductory chapter that puts the issues in historical context
    • Provides perspective and breadth, which will allow students to focus on areas of particular interest to them
    • Broad and recent papers cover trends in the field, connections with other psychology subdisciplines, and controversial issues
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    Product details

    • Date Published: August 1997
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9780521483346
    • length: 768 pages
    • dimensions: 230 x 154 x 42 mm
    • weight: 1.035kg
    • contains: 47 b/w illus. 40 tables
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Part I. Introduction:
    1. Judgment and decision research: some historical context William M. Goldstein and Robin M. Hogarth
    Part II. Currents:
    2. Reason-based choice Eldar Shafir, Itamar Simonson and Amos Tversky
    3. Probabilistic mental models: a Brunswikian theory of confidence Gerd Gigerenzer, Ulrich Hoffrage and Heinz Kleinbolting
    4. Direct comparison of the efficacy of intuitive and analytical cognition in expert judgment Kenneth R. Hammond, Robert M. Hamm, Janet Grassia, and Tamra Pearson
    5. The adaptive decision maker: effort and accuracy in choice John W. Payne, James R. Bettman and Eric J. Johnson
    6. Confirmation, disconfirmation, and information in hypothesis testing Joshua Klayman and Young-Won Ha
    7. Learning from feedback: exactingness and incentives Robin M. Hogarth, Brian J. Gibbs, Craig R. M. McKenzie and Margaret A. Marquis
    8. Covariation in natural causal induction Patricia W. Cheng and Laura R. Novick
    9. Propensities and counterfactuals: The loser that almost won Daniel Kahneman and Carol A. Varey
    10. The Process-performance paradox in expert judgment: how can experts know so much and predict so badly? Colin F. Camerer and Eric J. Johnson
    11. Intertemporal choice George Loewenstein and Richard H. Thaler
    12. Not me or thee but we: the important of group identity in eliciting cooperation in dilemna situations: experimental manipulations Robyn M. Dawes, Alphons J. C. van de Kragt and John M. Orbell
    13. Predicting a changing taste: do people know what they will like? Daniel Kahneman and Jackie Snell
    14. Endowment and contrast in judgment of well-being Amos Tversky and Dale Griffin
    Part III. Connections:
    15. The relationship between memory and judgment depends on whether the judgment task is memory-based or on-line Reid Hastie and Bernadette Park
    16. Explanation-based decision making: effects of memory structure on judgment Nancy Pennington and Reid Hastie
    17. Decision making under ignorance: arguing with yourself Robin M. Hogarth and Howard Kunreuther
    18. Positive affect and decision making Alice M. Isen
    Part IV. Controversies:
    19. The paramorphic representation of clinical judgment: a thirty-year retrospective Michael E. Doherty and Berndt Brehmer
    20. Islanders and hostages: deep and surface structures of decision problems Willem A. Wagenaar, Gideon Keren and Sarah Lichtenstein
    21. Content and discontent: indications and implications of domain specificity in preferential decision making William M. Goldstein and Elke U. Weber
    22. The case for rules in reasoning Edward E. Smith, Cristopher Langston and Richard E. Nisbett
    23. An alternative metaphor in the study of judgment and choice: people as politicians Philip E. Tetlock
    24. Between hope and fear: the psychology of risk Lola L. Lopes.

  • Editors

    William M. Goldstein, University of Chicago

    Robin M. Hogarth, University of Chicago

    Contributors

    William M. Goldstein, Robin M. Hogarth, Eldar Shafir, Itamar Simonson, Amos Tversky, Gerd Gigerenzer, Ulrich Hoffrage, Heinz Kleinbolting, Kenneth R. Hammond, Robert M. Hamm, Janet Grassia, Tamra Pearson, John W. Payne, James R. Bettman, Eric J. Johnson, Joshua Klayman, Young-Won Ha, Brian J. Gibbs, Craig R. M. McKenzie, Margaret A. Marquis, Daniel Kahneman, Carol A. Varey, Colin F. Camerer, George Loewenstein, Richard H. Thaler, Robyn M. Dawes, Alphons J. C. van de Kragt, John M. Orbell, Daniel Kahneman, Jackie Snell, Amos Tversky, Dale Griffin, Reid Hastie, Bernadette Park, Nancy Pennington, Robin M. Hogarth, Howard Kunreuther, Alice M. Isen, Michael E. Doherty , Berndt Brehmer, Willem A. Wagenaar, Gideon Keren, Sarah Lichtenstein, Elke U. Weber, Edward E. Smith, Cristopher Langston, Richard E. Nisbett, Philip E. Tetlock, Lola L. Lopes

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