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The Cambridge Handbook of the Psychology of Prejudice
Concise Student Edition

£29.99

textbook

Part of Cambridge Handbooks in Psychology

Chris G. Sibley, Fiona Kate Barlow, Marilynn B. Brewer, Oliver Sng, Keelah E. G. Williams, Steven L. Neuberg, Kumar Yogeeswaran, Thierry Devos, Kyle Nash, Jim Sidanius, Sarah Cotterill, Jennifer Sheehy-Skeffington, Nour Kteily, Héctor Carvacho, John Duckitt, James M. Sherlock, Brendan P. Zietsch, Linda R. Tropp, Agostino Mazziotta, Stephen C. Wright, John Dixon, Kevin Durrheim, Clifford Stevenson, Huseyin Cakal, Jane Elliott, John F. Dovidio, Samuel L. Gaertner, Adam R. Pearson, Danny Osborne, Paul G. Davies, Shirley Hutchinson, Colleen Ward, Agnes Szabo, Jaimee Stuart, Rachel A. Connor, Peter Glick, Susan T. Fiske, V. Paul Poteat, Michelle Birkett
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  • Date Published: October 2018
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9781108444361

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  • The Cambridge Handbook of the Psychology of Prejudice: Concise Student Edition aims to answer the questions: why is prejudice so persistent? How does it affect people exposed to it? And what can we do about it? With cutting-edge research from top scholars in the field, the chapters present an overview of psychological models of prejudice and investigate key domains such as racism, sexism, and the criminal justice system. This student edition of the award-winning Handbook includes new pedagogical features such as learning objectives, core terms and definitions, summary points, discussion questions, recommended reading, and an instructor's test bank. It also features a new conclusion chapter that analyzes eight hard problems currently faced by researchers and activists, thus engaging students in deep, forward-thinking discussion. Developed specifically for use in Psychology of Prejudice courses at the undergraduate and graduate levels, the Concise Student Edition is an essential teaching and learning resource.

    • Presents the essential topics in the psychology of prejudice, from its roots to its manifestations and consequences
    • New pedagogical features include learning objectives, core terms and definitions, summary points, discussion questions, recommended reading, and a test bank of multiple-choice questions
    • Features a new conclusion chapter that lays out eight 'hard problems' facing prejudice researchers and activists, prompting students to think critically about prejudice and their own role in maintaining or diminishing inequality
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    Reviews & endorsements

    'For those who want to work toward a nuanced understanding of prejudice, this Handbook is essential reading: a comprehensive, provocative, and thoughtful examination of why people are prejudiced, who is targeted, and what to do about it. This is a one-of-a-kind resource that will be indispensable to anyone engaged in the difficult business of teaching, researching, learning about, or challenging intergroup bias.' Matthew Hornsey, University of Queensland, Australia

    'This is a terrific book: comprehensive, authoritative, and current. The chapters cover traditional as well as cutting-edge topics in the psychology of prejudice in a highly accessible way. The final chapter on the 'eight hard problems' facing the scientific study of prejudice and its reduction is a gem. I highly recommend this book for both students and scholars interested in the psychology of prejudice.' Brenda Major, University of California, Santa Barbara

    'This book is a scholarly delight … a superb blend of foundational theories (and theorists) that have shaped our understanding of prejudice, and contemporary approaches that take this classic work in exciting new directions. This student edition will be an excellent resource for the classroom.' William von Hippel, Head of the School of Psychology, University of Queensland, Australia

    'Barlow and Sibley have connected an outstanding group of scholars in the science of prejudice to produce an exceptional student edition. Importantly, this volume offers students and researchers a ready-made curriculum that integrates theoretical perspectives on prejudice with practical exercises that deeply engage the reader in the real-world challenges of prejudice. A must for all readers intent on improving their understanding of the multiple layers of prejudice, now and into the future.' Fiona White, University of Sydney, Australia

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    Product details

    • Date Published: October 2018
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9781108444361
    • length: 458 pages
    • dimensions: 247 x 175 x 23 mm
    • weight: 0.93kg
    • contains: 13 b/w illus. 7 tables
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    Preface
    1. What is prejudice? An introduction Chris G. Sibley and Fiona Kate Barlow
    Part I. General Theoretical Perspectives:
    2. Intergroup discrimination: ingroup love or outgroup hate? Marilynn B. Brewer
    3. Evolutionary approaches to stereotyping and prejudice Oliver Sng, Keelah E. G. Williams and Steven L. Neuberg
    4. Understanding the nature, measurement, and utility of implicit intergroup biases Kumar Yogeeswaran, Thierry Devos and Kyle Nash
    5. Social dominance theory: explorations in the psychology of oppression Jim Sidanius, Sarah Cotterill, Jennifer Sheehy-Skeffington, Nour Kteily and Héctor Carvacho
    6. The dual process motivational model of ideology and prejudice John Duckitt and Chris G. Sibley
    7. Is prejudice heritable? Evidence from twin studies Fiona Kate Barlow, James M. Sherlock, and Brendan P. Zietsch
    8. Recent developments in intergroup contact research: affective processes, group status, and contact valence Linda R. Tropp, Agostino Mazziotta and Stephen C. Wright
    9. From prejudice reduction to collective action: two psychological models of social change (and how to reconcile them) John Dixon, Kevin Durrheim, Clifford Stevenson and Huseyin Cakal
    10. It's all about ignorance: reflections from the blue-eyed/brown-eyed exercise Jane Elliott
    Part II. Prejudice in Specific Domains:
    11. Aversive racism and contemporary bias John F. Dovidio, Samuel L. Gaertner and Adam R. Pearson
    12. Stereotypicality biases in the criminal justice system Danny Osborne, Paul G. Davies and Shirley Hutchinson
    13. Prejudice against immigrants in multicultural societies Colleen Ward, Agnes Szabo and Jaimee Stuart
    14. Ambivalent sexism in the twenty-first century Rachel A. Connor, Peter Glick and Susan T. Fiske
    15. Sexual prejudice: advances in conceptual and empirical models V. Paul Poteat and Michelle Birkett
    16. Where do we go from here? The eight hard problems facing the scientific study of prejudice and its reduction Fiona Kate Barlow and Chris G. Sibley
    Index.

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  • Editors

    Fiona Kate Barlow, University of Queensland
    Fiona Kate Barlow is an Australian Research Council Future Fellow at the School of Psychology, the University of Queensland, Australia. She is a social psychologist specializing in the study of race relations, with a particular focus on how the small interracial interactions that we have shape our racial attitudes and behaviors. From 2012 to 2014 Barlow held an Australian Research Council early career fellowship, and in 2017 she was the chief scientist on the critically acclaimed documentary The Truth About Racism. She is also the recipient of the 2013 Society for Australasian Social Psychology Early Career Researcher Award, and multiple teaching and postgraduate supervision awards.

    Chris G. Sibley, University of Auckland
    Chris G. Sibley is a professor of psychology at the University of Auckland, New Zealand. He is a social psychologist and the founder of the New Zealand Attitudes and Values Study (NZAVS), a twenty-year longitudinal national probability study of social attitudes, personality, and health outcomes across New Zealand. As an author of over 200 peer-reviewed articles and book chapters, he was identified as a 'Rising Star' by the Association for Psychological Science in 2011 and received the Erik Erikson Early Career Award in 2014 from the International Society of Political Psychology. He is a long-time collaborator of Dr Fiona Kate Barlow.

    Contributors

    Chris G. Sibley, Fiona Kate Barlow, Marilynn B. Brewer, Oliver Sng, Keelah E. G. Williams, Steven L. Neuberg, Kumar Yogeeswaran, Thierry Devos, Kyle Nash, Jim Sidanius, Sarah Cotterill, Jennifer Sheehy-Skeffington, Nour Kteily, Héctor Carvacho, John Duckitt, James M. Sherlock, Brendan P. Zietsch, Linda R. Tropp, Agostino Mazziotta, Stephen C. Wright, John Dixon, Kevin Durrheim, Clifford Stevenson, Huseyin Cakal, Jane Elliott, John F. Dovidio, Samuel L. Gaertner, Adam R. Pearson, Danny Osborne, Paul G. Davies, Shirley Hutchinson, Colleen Ward, Agnes Szabo, Jaimee Stuart, Rachel A. Connor, Peter Glick, Susan T. Fiske, V. Paul Poteat, Michelle Birkett

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