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Irish Opinion and the American Revolution, 1760–1783

$58.99

  • Date Published: July 2007
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9780521037303

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About the Authors
  • This study traces the impact of the American Revolution and of the international war it precipitated on the political outlook of each section of Irish society. Morley uses a dazzling array of sources - newspapers, pamphlets, sermons and political songs, including Irish-language documents unknown to other scholars and previously unpublished - to trace the evolving attitudes of the Anglican, Catholic and Presbyterian communities from the beginning of colonial unrest in the early 1760s until the end of hostilities in 1783. He also reassesses the influence of the American revolutionary war on such developments as Catholic relief, the removal of restrictions on Irish trade, and Britain's recognition of Irish legislative independence. Morley sheds light on the nature of Anglo-Irish patriotism and Catholic political consciousness, and reveals the extent to which the polarities of the 1790s had already emerged by the end of the American war.

    • Uses previously neglected Irish-language sources to shed light on the period
    • Examines the impact of the American Revolution on all sectors of Irish society
    • An authoritative account of a key period in Irish history
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    Reviews & endorsements

    'Drawing on a wide range of sources, especially newspapers, pamphlets, vernacular song, and published sermons, Dr Morley charts the evolution of attitudes in Ireland at each stage of the revolution, whether those produced directly through the operation of American example on Irish opinion or indirectly as a result of altered circumstances arising from the war.' Jeremy Black, H-Albion

    'One of the merits of the original study, Irish Opinion and the American Revolution, 1760–1783 by Vincent Morley, is the inclusion of Gaelic manuscripts in its impressive array of sources.' Irish Times

    'This is an excellent book … which will become a major reference point for future work on Ireland in the last half of the eighteenth century.' Irish Studies Review

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    Product details

    • Date Published: July 2007
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9780521037303
    • length: 380 pages
    • dimensions: 227 x 151 x 21 mm
    • weight: 0.578kg
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Preface
    Textual note
    List of abbreviations
    Introduction
    1. Imperial unrest, 1760–75
    2. Colonial rebellion, 1775–8
    3. International war, 1778–81
    4. Britain defeated, 1781–3
    Postscript
    Bibliography
    Index.

  • Author

    Vincent Morley, National University of Ireland, Galway
    Vincent Morley was previously a researcher with the Royal Irish Academy and has lectured in Irish history at the National University of Ireland.

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