Skip to content
Register Sign in Wishlist

Black British Migrants in Cuba
Race, Labor, and Empire in the Twentieth-Century Caribbean, 1898–1948

$84.00 USD

Part of Cambridge Studies on the African Diaspora

  • Date Published: September 2018
  • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • format: Adobe eBook Reader
  • isbn: 9781108534598

$ 84.00 USD
Adobe eBook Reader

You will be taken to ebooks.com for this purchase
Buy eBook Add to wishlist

Other available formats:
Hardback


Looking for an evaluation copy?

This title is not currently available for evaluation. However, if you are interested in the title for your course we can consider offering an evaluation copy. To register your interest please contact asiamktg@cambridge.org providing details of the course you are teaching.

Description
Product filter button
Description
Contents
Resources
Courses
About the Authors
  • Black British Migrants in Cuba offers a comprehensive study of migration from the British Caribbean to Cuba in the pre-World War II era, spotlighting an important chapter of the larger trajectory of the Afro-Atlantic diaspora. Grounded in extensive and rigorous multi-sited research, this book examines the different migration experiences of Jamaican, Leeward, and Windward Islanders, along with the transnational processes of labor recruitment and the local control of workers in the plantation. The book also explains the history of racial fear and political and economic forces behind the marking of black migrants as the 'Other' and the resulting discrimination, racism, and violence against them. Through analysis of the oppositional and resistance strategies employed by British Antilleans, the author conveys migrants' determination to work, live, and survive in the Caribbean.

    • Offers a comprehensive history of British Antilleans in Cuba
    • Focuses on the pre-World War II era to fill the historical void in twentieth-century analysis of the Afro-Caribbean diaspora
    • Uses regional newspapers to provide concrete examples of discrimination against Caribbean migrants
    Read more

    Customer reviews

    Not yet reviewed

    Be the first to review

    Review was not posted due to profanity

    ×

    , create a review

    (If you're not , sign out)

    Please enter the right captcha value
    Please enter a star rating.
    Your review must be a minimum of 12 words.

    How do you rate this item?

    ×

    Product details

    • Date Published: September 2018
    • format: Adobe eBook Reader
    • isbn: 9781108534598
    • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • Table of Contents

    List of figures
    Acknowledgments
    Introduction
    1. Historical groundings: unsettled times, unsettled people
    2. Black British Caribbean migration to Cuba, 1898–1948
    3. Migration, racial fears, and violence, 1898–1917
    4. The limits of British imperial support: diplomacy after Jobabo and Cuban national interests
    5. 'Cuba got mash up': British Antilleans between Cuba and the Empire, 1921–1925
    6. The racial politics of migrant labor: company town control, and repatriations, 1925–1931
    7. Transactions in Colonial Caribbean governments and consular policy, 1925–1933
    8. The nationalization of labor and Caribbean workers, 1933–1938
    9. 'The best and most permanent solution?' Repatriation or Assimilation, 1938–1948
    10. Race, nation, and empire
    Epilogue
    Bibliography
    Index.

  • Author

    Jorge L. Giovannetti-Torres, University of Puerto Rico
    Jorge L. Giovannetti-Torres is Professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at the University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras.

Sign In

Please sign in to access your account

Cancel

Not already registered? Create an account now. ×

Sorry, this resource is locked

Please register or sign in to request access. If you are having problems accessing these resources please email lecturers@cambridge.org

Register Sign in
Please note that this file is password protected. You will be asked to input your password on the next screen.

» Proceed

You are now leaving the Cambridge University Press website. Your eBook purchase and download will be completed by our partner www.ebooks.com. Please see the permission section of the www.ebooks.com catalogue page for details of the print & copy limits on our eBooks.

Continue ×

Continue ×

Continue ×

Find content that relates to you

Join us online

This site uses cookies to improve your experience. Read more Close

Are you sure you want to delete your account?

This cannot be undone.

Cancel

Thank you for your feedback which will help us improve our service.

If you requested a response, we will make sure to get back to you shortly.

×
Please fill in the required fields in your feedback submission.
×