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Genetics, Demography and Viability of Fragmented Populations

Genetics, Demography and Viability of Fragmented Populations

Part of Conservation Biology

P. Brussard, G. Clarke, A. Young, W. Sherwin, C. Moritz, M. Dudash, C. Fenster, K. Holsinger, P. Thrall, J. Burdon, B. Murray, M. Burgman, H. Possingham, P. Hedrick, S. Daniels, J. Priddy, J. Walters, S. Srikwan, D. Woodruff, D. Lindenmayer, R. Peakall, J. Dietz, A. Baker, J. Ballou, G. Gutierreez-Espelta, S. Kalinowski, D. Kelly, J. Ladley, A. Robertson, D. Norton, C. Richards, G. White, D. Boshier, J. Oostermeijer, A. Brown, B. Murray, C. Miller
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  • Date Published: October 2000
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9780521794213

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About the Authors
  • Habitat fragmentation is one of the most ubiquitous and serious environmental threats confronting the long-term survival of plant and animal species worldwide. As species become restricted to remnant habitats, effective management for long-term conservation requires a quantitative understanding of the genetic and demographic effects of habitat fragmentation, and the implications for population viability. This book provides a detailed introduction to the genetic and demographic issues relevant to the conservation of fragmented populations such as demographic stochasticity; genetic erosion; inbreeding; metapopulation biology and population viability analysis. Also presented are two sets of case studies, one on animals, the other on plants, which illustrate a variety of approaches, including the application of molecular genetic markers, the investigation of reproductive biology, and the combination of demographic monitoring and modeling, to examine long-term population viability.

    • Focuses on habitat fragmentation, one of the most serious threats to species worldwide
    • Unique integrated approach - considers both genetic and demographic data to assess population viability in fragmented habitats
    • Brings together the relevant theory required to manage conservation in fragmented habitats
    • Presents a range of case studies which illustrate a variety of approaches for examining long-term population viability
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    Reviews & endorsements

    'I really enjoyed some of the case studies … understanding deterministic decline and its cure represents the greatest challenges to conservation biology. However, Clarke and Young show that understanding small-population processes might help maintain populations until 'the patient' can be cured.' Ken Norris, Biologist

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    Product details

    • Date Published: October 2000
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9780521794213
    • length: 460 pages
    • copublisher: The Zoological Society of London
    • dimensions: 229 x 152 x 26 mm
    • weight: 0.67kg
    • contains: 69 b/w illus. 34 tables
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Foreword P. Brussard
    1. Introduction: genetics, demography and the conservation of fragmented populations G. Clarke and A. Young
    Part I. Introductory Concepts:
    2. Managing and monitoring genetic erosion W. Sherwin and C. Moritz
    3. Inbreeding and outbreeding depression in fragmented populations M. Dudash and C. Fenster
    4. Demography and extinction in small populations K. Holsinger
    5. The metapopulation paradigm: a fragmented view of conservation biology P. Thrall, J. Burdon and B. Murray
    6. Population viability analysis for conservation: the good, the bad and the undescribed M. Burgman and H. Possingham
    7. Applications of population genetics and molecular techniques to conservation biology P. Hedrick
    Part II. Animal Case Studies:
    8. Inbreeding in small populations of red-cockaded woodpeckers: insights from a spatially-explicit individual-based model S. Daniels, J. Priddy and J. Walters
    9. Genetic erosion in isolated small mammal populations following rain forest fragmentation S. Srikwan and D. Woodruff
    10. The Tumut experiment - integrating demographic and genetic studies to unravel fragmentation effects: a case study of the native bush rat D. Lindenmayer and R. Peakall
    11. Demographic evidence of inbreeding depression in wild golden lion tamarins J. Dietz, A. Baker and J. Ballou
    12. Inferring demography from genetics - a case study of the endangered golden sun moth, Synemon plana G. Clarke
    13. Genetic population structure in desert bighorn sheep: implications for conservation in Arizona G. Gutierreez-Espelta, S. Kalinowski and P. Hedrick
    Part III. Plant Case Studies:
    14. Limited forest fragmentation improves reproduction in the declining New Zealand mistletoe Peraxilla tetrapetala (Loranthaceae) D. Kelly, J. Ladley, A. Robertson and D. Norton
    15. Ecology and genetics of Grevillea (Proteaceae)
    16. Genetic and demographic influences on population persistence: gene flow and genetic rescue in Silene alba C. Richards
    17. Fragmentation in central American dry forests - genetic impacts on Swietenia humulis (Meliaceae) G. White and D. Boshier
    18. Population viability analysis of the rare Gentiana pneumonanthe: importance of genetics, demography and reproductive biology J. Oostermeijer
    19. Genetic erosion, restricted mating and reduced viability in fragmented populations of the endangered grassland herb Rutidosis leptorrhynchoides A. Young, A. Brown, B. Murray, P. Thrall and C. Miller
    Part IV. Conclusions and Future Directions:
    20. What do we know about the genetic and demographic effects of habitat fragmentation and where do we go from here? A. Young and G. Clarke
    Index.

  • Editors

    Andrew G. Young, Division of Plant Industry CSIRO, Canberra

    Geoffrey M. Clarke, Division of Entomology, CSIRO, Canberra

    Contributors

    P. Brussard, G. Clarke, A. Young, W. Sherwin, C. Moritz, M. Dudash, C. Fenster, K. Holsinger, P. Thrall, J. Burdon, B. Murray, M. Burgman, H. Possingham, P. Hedrick, S. Daniels, J. Priddy, J. Walters, S. Srikwan, D. Woodruff, D. Lindenmayer, R. Peakall, J. Dietz, A. Baker, J. Ballou, G. Gutierreez-Espelta, S. Kalinowski, D. Kelly, J. Ladley, A. Robertson, D. Norton, C. Richards, G. White, D. Boshier, J. Oostermeijer, A. Brown, B. Murray, C. Miller

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