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The Primate Fossil Record

The Primate Fossil Record

£80.99

Part of Cambridge Studies in Biological and Evolutionary Anthropology

Walter Carl Hartwig, David Tab Rasmussen, Herbert H. Covert, Daniel L. Gebo, Gregg F. Gunnell, Kenneth D. Rose, Erica Phillips, Alan C. Walker, Laurie R. Godfrey, William L. Jungers, Marian Dagosto, K. Christopher Beard, Alfred L. Rosenberger, John G. Fleagle, Marcelo F. Tejedor, D. Jeffrey Meldrum, Ross D. E. MacPhee, Ines Horovitz, David Begun, Brenda Benefit, Monte L. McCrossin, Nina G. Jablonski, David R. Pilbeam, Terry Harrison, Jay Kelley, Steven C. Ward, Dana Duren, Henry M. McHenry, Tim D. White, Holly Dunsworth, Fred Smith
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  • Date Published: September 2008
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9780521081412

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About the Authors
  • A comprehensive treatment of primate paleontology. Profusely illustrated and up to date, it captures the complete history of the discovery and interpretation of primate fossils. The chapters range from primate origins to the advent of anatomically modern humans. Each emphasizes three key components of the record of primate evolution: history of discovery, taxonomy of the fossils, and evolution of the adaptive radiations they represent. The Primate Fossil Record summarizes objectively the many intellectual debates surrounding the fossil record and provides a foundation of reference information on the last two decades of astounding discoveries and worldwide field research for physical anthropologists, paleontologists and evolutionary biologists.

    • First comprehensive treatment of primate and human paleontology in two decades
    • Profusely illustrated and up to date
    • Essential reference work for anyone working on primate evolution and paleoanthropology
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    Reviews & endorsements

    'An essential reference for any university library.' New Scientist

    '… a treasure-trove of up-to-date descriptive and interpretative summaries … this will be a must for any paleoanthropologist or paleontologist working on fossil primates. The editor and Cambridge deserve kudos for this product.' The Human Nature Review

    'I can recommend The Primate Fossil Record to students and professionals alike. Besides aiding in their research, it will also, in particular thanks to its History of Discovery and Debate and Evolution sections, be a great resource to those who teach primate evolution.' PalAss Newsletter

    '…[an] essential reference work for the foreseeable future.' TRENDS in Ecology & Evolution

    '… a magnificent contribution to the literature on primate evolution … anyone teaching or researching on primate evolution will want a copy.' Journal of Human Evolution

    '… an impressively clear compilation and synthesis of knowledge and interpretations of the primate fossil record … a key reference text for both the specialist primate palaeontologist and others in primatology with an interest in the evolutionary record.' Primate Eye

    '… [an achievement] that is unlikely to be equalled for some considerable time.' Folia Primatologica

    '… this volume succeeds brilliantly as a reference source. It will be a welcome companion for paleo-primatologists for the next two decades … another very positive element of this volume are the numerous high-quality photographs and line drawings of fossil material.' Journal of Paleontology

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    Product details

    • Date Published: September 2008
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9780521081412
    • length: 552 pages
    • dimensions: 279 x 210 x 28 mm
    • weight: 1.23kg
    • contains: 454 b/w illus. 19 tables
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Preface
    Acknowledgements
    1. Introduction to the primate fossil record Walter Carl Hartwig
    2. The origin of primates David Tab Rasmussen
    Part I. The Earliest Primates and the Fossil Record of Prosimians:
    3. The earliest fossil primates and the evolution of prosimians Herbert H. Covert
    4. Adapiformes: phylogeny and adaptation Daniel L. Gebo
    5. Tarsiiformes: evolutionary history and adaptation Gregg F. Gunnell and Kenneth D. Rose
    6. Fossil lorisoids Erica Phillips and Alan C. Walker
    7. Quaternary fossil lemurs Laurie R. Godfrey and William L. Jungers
    Part II. The Origin and Diversification of Anthropoid Primates:
    8. The origin and diversification of anthropoid primates - introduction Marian Dagosto
    9. Basal anthropoids K. Christopher Beard
    10. Platyrrhine paleontology and systematics: the paradigm shifts Alfred L. Rosenberger
    11. Early platyrrhines of southern South America John G. Fleagle and Marcelo F. Tejedor
    12. Miocene platyrrhines of the northern neotropics Walter Carl Hartwig and D. Jeffrey Meldrum
    13. Extinct Quaternary platyrrhines of the Greater Antilles and Brazil Ross D. E. MacPhee and Ines Horovitz
    Part III. The Fossil Record of the Early Catarrhines and Old World Monkeys:
    14. Early catarrhines of the African Eocene and Oligocene David Tab Rasmussen
    15. The Pliopithecoidea David Begun
    16. The Victoriapithecidae, Cercopithecoidea Brenda Benefit and Monte L. McCrossin
    17. Fossil Old World monkeys: the Late Neogene radiation Nina G. Jablonski
    Part IV. The Fossil Record of Hominoid Primates:
    18. Perspectives on the Miocene Hominoidea David R. Pilbeam
    19. Late Oligocene to Middle Miocene catarrhines from Afro-Arabia Terry Harrison
    20. European hominoids David Begun
    21. The hominoid radiation in Asia Jay Kelley
    22. Middle and Late Miocene African hominoids Steven C. Ward and Dana Duren
    Part V. The Fossil Record of Human Ancestry:
    23. Introduction to the fossil record of human ancestry Henry M. McHenry
    24. Earliest hominids Tim D. White
    25. Early genus Homo Holly Dunsworth and Alan C. Walker
    26. Migrations, radiations and continuity: patterns in the evolution of Middle and Late Pleistocene humans Fred Smith
    References cited
    Index.

  • Editor

    Walter Carl Hartwig, Touro University College of Osteopathic Medicine, California
    WALTER HARTWIG is Associate Professor of Anatomy at Touro University College of Osteopathic Medicine in northern California. He has conducted paleontological field research in South America and Africa, and has authored over 40 scientific articles and book chapters on comparative anatomy, primate evolution and the history of sciences. Professor Hartwig is also founder and director of FOUNTAINHEAD, a non-profit organization dedicated to improving medical care, education and scientific research in underdeveloped countries.

    Contributors

    Walter Carl Hartwig, David Tab Rasmussen, Herbert H. Covert, Daniel L. Gebo, Gregg F. Gunnell, Kenneth D. Rose, Erica Phillips, Alan C. Walker, Laurie R. Godfrey, William L. Jungers, Marian Dagosto, K. Christopher Beard, Alfred L. Rosenberger, John G. Fleagle, Marcelo F. Tejedor, D. Jeffrey Meldrum, Ross D. E. MacPhee, Ines Horovitz, David Begun, Brenda Benefit, Monte L. McCrossin, Nina G. Jablonski, David R. Pilbeam, Terry Harrison, Jay Kelley, Steven C. Ward, Dana Duren, Henry M. McHenry, Tim D. White, Holly Dunsworth, Fred Smith

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