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Primate Parasite Ecology
The Dynamics and Study of Host-Parasite Relationships

£98.00

Part of Cambridge Studies in Biological and Evolutionary Anthropology

Michael A. Huffman, Colin A. Chapman, Ellis C. Greiner, Antoinette McIntosh, Hideo Hasegawa, Robin B. Gasser, Johanna M. de Gruijter, Anton M. Polderman, Michael Muehlenbein, Charles L. Nunn, Michael V. K. Sukhdeo, Suzanne C. Sukhdeo, Anthony Di Fiore, Todd Disotell, Pascal Gagneux, Francisco J. Ayala, Peter D. Walsh, Magdalena Bermejo, José Domingo Rodríguez-Teijeiro, Taranjit Kaur, Jatinder Singh, David L. Reed, Melissa A. Toups, Jessica E. Light, Julie M. Allen, Shelly Flannigan, Natalie Leo, Shiho Fujita, Asami Ogasawara, Takashi Kageyama, Kazunari Ushida, Jozef Dupain, Carlos Nell, Klára Judita Petrželková, Paola Garcia, David Modrý, Francisco Ponce Gordo, Patricia C. Wright, Summer J. Arrigo-Nelson, Kristina L. Hogg, Brian Bannon, Toni Lyn Morelli, Jeffrey Wyatt, A. L. Harivelo, Felix Ratelolahy, Paula Pebsworth, Chris Bakuneeta, Shunji Gotoh, Massimo Bardi, Nathan D. Wolfe, William M. Switzer, Sylvia K. Vitazkova, Alexander D. Hernandez, Andrew J. MacIntosh, Anna H. Weyher, Jessica M. Rothman, Stacey A. M. Hodder, Jessica M. Rothman, Alice N. Pell, Dwight D. Bowman, Sadie J. Ryan, Raja Sengupta, Tony L. Goldberg, Hideo Hasegawa
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  • Date Published: February 2009
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9780521872461

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About the Authors
  • Anyone who has spent an extended period in the tropics has an idea, through caring for others or first-hand experience, just what it is like to be a primate parasite host. Monkeys and apes often share parasites with humans, for example the HIV viruses which evolved from related viruses of chimpanzees and sooty mangabeys, and so understanding the ecology of infectious diseases in non-human primates is of paramount importance. Furthermore, there is accumulating evidence that environmental change may promote contact between humans and non-human primates and increase the possibility of sharing infectious disease. Written for academic researchers, this book addresses these issues and provides up-to-date information on the methods of study, natural history and ecology/theory of the exciting field of primate parasite ecology.

    • Contains chapters that point the academic community in new directions for investigations
    • Combines theory and practice to give a well-rounded understanding of how parasite host systems operate
    • Written in a straightforward style that is accessible to non parasitologists, and will appeal to a wide audience, including primatologists and conservation biologists.
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    'this book is useful to both graduate students or researchers.' Mammalia

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    Product details

    • Date Published: February 2009
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9780521872461
    • length: 548 pages
    • dimensions: 235 x 157 x 30 mm
    • weight: 0.99kg
    • contains: 48 b/w illus.
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    Primate disease ecology: an integrative approach
    Part I. Methods to Study Primate-Parasite Interactions:
    1. Collection methods and diagnostic procedures for primate parasitology
    2. Methods of collection and identification of minute nematodes from the feces of primates, with special application to coevolutionary study of pinworms
    3. The utility of molecular methods for elucidating primate-pathogen relationships – the Oesophagostomum bifurcum example
    4. The application of endocrine measures in primate parasite ecology
    5. Using agent-based models to investigate primate disease ecology
    Part II. The Natural History of Primate–Parasite Interactions:
    6. What does a parasite see when it looks at a chimpanzee?
    7. Primate malarias: evolution, adaptation, and species jumping
    8. Disease avoidance and the evolution of primate social connectivity: Ebola, bats, gorillas, and chimpanzees
    9. Primate-parasitic zoonoses and anthropozoonses: a literature review
    10. Lice and other parasites as markers of primate evolutionary history
    11. Cryptic species and biodiversity of lice from primates
    12. Prevalence of Clostridium perfringens in intestinal microflora of non-human primates
    13. Intestinal bacteria of chimpanzees in the wild and in captivity - an application of molecular ecological methodologies
    14. Gastrointestinal parasites of bonobos in the Lomako Forest, Democratic Republic of Congo
    15. Habitat disturbance and seasonal fluctuations of lemur parasites in the rain forest of Ranomafana National Park, Madagascar
    16. Chimpanzee-parasite ecology at Budongo Forest (Uganda) and the Mahale Mountains (Tanzania): influence of climatic differences on self-medicative behavior
    Part III. The Ecology of Primate–Parasite Interactions:
    17. Primate exposure and the emergence of novel retroviruses
    18. Overview of parasites infecting howler monkeys, Alouatta sp., and potential consequences of human-howler interactions
    19. Primate parasite ecology: patterns and predictions from an ongoing study of Japanese macaques
    20. Crop raiding: the influence of behavioral and nutritional changes on primate-parasite relationships
    21. Can parasites infections be a selective force influencing primate group size? A test with red colobus
    22. How does diet quality affect the parasite ecology of mountain gorillas?
    23 Host-parasite Dynamics: Connecting Primate Field Data to Theory
    Part IV. Conclusions:
    24. Ways forward in the study of primate disease ecology
    25. Useful diagnostic references and images of protozoans, helminths, and nematodes commonly found in wild primates.

  • Editors

    Michael A. Huffman, Kyoto University, Japan
    Michael Huffman is an Associate Professor, and the first North American tenured faculty member, at Kyoto University's Primate Research Institute. He is currently an editor for the American Journal of Primatology, and has been the PI of several multi-disciplinary international collaborations spanning over 15 countries.

    Colin A. Chapman, McGill University, Montréal
    Colin Chapman is a Professor in the Department of Anthropology and McGill School of Environment at McGill University. He has been an associate scientist with the Wildlife Conservation Society since 1995 and for the last 17 years has conducted research in the Kibale National Park, Uganda.

    Contributors

    Michael A. Huffman, Colin A. Chapman, Ellis C. Greiner, Antoinette McIntosh, Hideo Hasegawa, Robin B. Gasser, Johanna M. de Gruijter, Anton M. Polderman, Michael Muehlenbein, Charles L. Nunn, Michael V. K. Sukhdeo, Suzanne C. Sukhdeo, Anthony Di Fiore, Todd Disotell, Pascal Gagneux, Francisco J. Ayala, Peter D. Walsh, Magdalena Bermejo, José Domingo Rodríguez-Teijeiro, Taranjit Kaur, Jatinder Singh, David L. Reed, Melissa A. Toups, Jessica E. Light, Julie M. Allen, Shelly Flannigan, Natalie Leo, Shiho Fujita, Asami Ogasawara, Takashi Kageyama, Kazunari Ushida, Jozef Dupain, Carlos Nell, Klára Judita Petrželková, Paola Garcia, David Modrý, Francisco Ponce Gordo, Patricia C. Wright, Summer J. Arrigo-Nelson, Kristina L. Hogg, Brian Bannon, Toni Lyn Morelli, Jeffrey Wyatt, A. L. Harivelo, Felix Ratelolahy, Paula Pebsworth, Chris Bakuneeta, Shunji Gotoh, Massimo Bardi, Nathan D. Wolfe, William M. Switzer, Sylvia K. Vitazkova, Alexander D. Hernandez, Andrew J. MacIntosh, Anna H. Weyher, Jessica M. Rothman, Stacey A. M. Hodder, Jessica M. Rothman, Alice N. Pell, Dwight D. Bowman, Sadie J. Ryan, Raja Sengupta, Tony L. Goldberg, Hideo Hasegawa

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