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Orientalism and Literature

Orientalism and Literature

Part of Cambridge Critical Concepts

  • Editor: Geoffrey P. Nash, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London
Geoffrey P. Nash, Suvir Kaul, James Watt, Saree Makdisi, Sukanya Banerjee, Daniel Bivona, Christopher Hutton, Ivan D. Kalmar, Eleanor Byrne, Reina Lewis, Ali Behdad, David Weir, Valerie Kennedy, Andrew C. Long, Mahmut Mutman, Peter Morey, Carol W. N. Fadda, Moneera Ghadeer, Anouar Majid, Patrick Williams
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  • Publication planned for: November 2019
  • availability: Not yet published - available from November 2019
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781108499002

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  • Orientalism and Literature discusses a key critical concept in literary studies and how it assists our reading of literature. It reviews the concept's evolution: how it has been explored, imagined and narrated in literature. Part I considers Orientalism's origins and its geographical and multidisciplinary scope, then considers the major genres and trends Orientalism inspired in the literary-critical field such as the eighteenth-century Oriental tale, reading the Bible, and Victorian Oriental fiction. Part II recaptures specific aspects of Edward Said's Orientalism: the multidisciplinary contexts and scholarly discussions it has inspired (such as colonial discourse, race, resistance, feminism and travel writing). Part III deliberates upon recent and possible future applications of Orientalism, probing its currency and effectiveness in the twenty-first century, the role it has played and continues to play in the operation of power, and how in new forms, neo-Orientalism and Islamophobia, it feeds into various genres, from migrant writing to journalism.

    • Presents a new, major re-assessment of Orientalism and literature
    • Shows that Orientalism functions in a variety of historical and contemporary writings
    • Provides a solid grasp of Orientalism's origins, development, and continuing application
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    Product details

    • Publication planned for: November 2019
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9781108499002
    • dimensions: 229 x 152 mm
    • availability: Not yet published - available from November 2019
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction Geoffrey P. Nash
    Part I. Origins:
    1. Styles of Orientalism in the eighteenth century Suvir Kaul
    2. The origin and development of the Oriental tale James Watt
    3. Romantic Orientalism and Occidentalism Saree Makdisi
    4. The Victorians: empire and the East Sukanya Banerjee
    5. Orientalism and Victorian fiction Daniel Bivona
    6. Orientalism and race: Aryans and Semites Christopher Hutton
    7. Orientalism and the Bible Ivan D. Kalmar
    Part II. Development:
    8. Said, Bhabha and the colonized subject Eleanor Byrne
    9. The Harem: gendering Orientalism Reina Lewis
    10. Orientalism and Middle East travel writing Ali Behdad
    11. Nineteenth and twentieth American Orientalism David Weir
    12. Edward Said and resistance in colonial and postcolonial literatures Valerie Kennedy
    13. Can the cosmopolitan writer be absolved of racism? Andrew C. Long
    Part III. Application:
    14. From Orientalism to Islamophobia Mahmut Mutman
    15. Applications of neo-Orientalism and Islamophobia in recent writing Peter Morey
    16. Orientalism and cultural translation: Middle-Eastern American writing Carol W. N. Fadda
    17. New Orientalism and the American media: New York Cleopatra and Saudi 'giggly black ghosts' Moneera Ghadeer
    18. On Orientalism's future(s) Anouar Majid
    19. The engine of survival: a future for Orientalism Patrick Williams.

  • Editor

    Geoffrey P. Nash, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London
    Geoffrey P. Nash is a Research Associate at the School of African and Oriental Studies, University of London. He is the author/editor of: Marmaduke Pickthall: Islam and the Modern World (2016); Postcolonialism and Islam: Theory, Literature, Culture and Film (2014); Writing Muslim Identity (2012); Comte de Gobineau and Orientalism: Selected Eastern Writings (2008).

    Contributors

    Geoffrey P. Nash, Suvir Kaul, James Watt, Saree Makdisi, Sukanya Banerjee, Daniel Bivona, Christopher Hutton, Ivan D. Kalmar, Eleanor Byrne, Reina Lewis, Ali Behdad, David Weir, Valerie Kennedy, Andrew C. Long, Mahmut Mutman, Peter Morey, Carol W. N. Fadda, Moneera Ghadeer, Anouar Majid, Patrick Williams

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