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Form and Function in Roman Oratory

$34.99

D. H. Berry, Andrew Erskine, J. G. F. Powell, Catherine Steel, Glenys Davies, Christopher Craig, Andrew M. Riggsby, Roger Rees, Bruce Gibson, Anthony Corbeill, John T. Ramsey, Regine May, Carl Joachim Classen, Harry Hine, William W. Batstone, Christina Shuttleworth Kraus, Christopher Smith, Roland Mayer, A. J. Woodman
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  • Date Published: September 2016
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9781107499942

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About the Authors
  • In this book Roman oratory is explored from the perspective of form and function. Leading scholars in the field of Latin prose consider not only the speeches of Cicero, Pliny, Apuleius and the later panegyrists, but also those found in Roman philosophical writing, and in the histories of Caesar, Sallust, Livy and Tacitus. In each case, analysis of the interplay of form and function takes us to the heart of the process by which the author's aims are realised. The book also considers the functions of texts within speeches, the functions of not speaking and the representation of oratorical 'form' in Roman sculpture. An original and wide-ranging study, Form and Function in Roman Oratory will appeal to scholars and students with interests in Roman oratory, historiography, philosophy and art.

    • Provides the reader with an enhanced understanding of rhetorical 'form' and 'function' by examining Cicero and other Roman orators
    • Encourages readers to make connections involving speech/oratory by including chapters on Roman philosophy and art
    • Written by leading scholars in the field of Latin prose
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    Reviews & endorsements

    'This is a diverse collection of papers, in which the central theme of the relationship between form and function is broadly and variously interpreted; nevertheless, the juxtaposition of the eighteen concise studies from a fine array of scholars is at times thought-provoking.' Rebecca Langlands, Greece and Rome

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    Product details

    • Date Published: September 2016
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9781107499942
    • length: 368 pages
    • dimensions: 230 x 153 x 20 mm
    • weight: 0.54kg
    • contains: 12 b/w illus. 1 table
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Contributors
    Preface
    List of figures
    1. Form and function D. H. Berry and Andrew Erskine
    Part I. The Orator and his Setting:
    2. Court procedure and rhetorical strategy in Cicero J. G. F. Powell
    3. Tribunician sacrosanctity and oratorical performance in the late republic Catherine Steel
    4. Togate statues and petrified orators Glenys Davies
    Part II. Rhetorical Strategies:
    5. Means and ends of Indignatio in Cicero's Pro Roscio Amerino Christopher Craig
    6. Form as global strategy in Cicero's Second Catilinarian Andrew M. Riggsby
    7. The form and function of narrative in panegyric Roger Rees
    8. Unending praise: Pliny and ending panegyric Bruce Gibson
    Part III. Texts in Speeches:
    9. The function of a divinely inspired text in Cicero's De harvspicvm responsis Anthony Corbeill
    10. Debate at a distance: a unique rhetorical strategy in Cicero's Thirteenth Philippic John T. Ramsey
    11. The function of verse quotations in Apuleius' speeches: making the case with Plato Regine May
    Part IV. Speeches in Philosophy:
    12. Teaching philosophy, a form or function of Roman oratory: Velleius' speech in Cicero's De Natvra Deorvm Carl Joachim Classen
    13. Form and function of speech in the prose work of the younger Seneca Harry Hine
    Part V. Speeches in Historiography:
    14. Catiline's speeches in Sallust's Bellvm Catilinae William W. Batstone
    15. Speech and silence in Caesar's Bellvm Gallicvm Christina Shuttleworth Kraus
    16. Rhetorical history: the struggle of the orders in Livy Christopher Smith
    17. Oratory in Tacitus' Annals Roland Mayer
    18. Aliena Facvndia: Seneca in Tacitus A. J. Woodman
    Notes
    Abbreviations and bibliography
    Indexes.

  • Editors

    D. H. Berry, University of Edinburgh
    D. H. Berry is Senior Lecturer in Classics at the University of Edinburgh. He is the author of Cicero: Pro P. Sulla Oratio (1996), Cicero: Defence Speeches (2000) and Cicero: Political Speeches (2006). He has also edited a revision of M. L. Clarke's Rhetoric at Rome (1996).

    Andrew Erskine, University of Edinburgh
    Andrew Erskine is Professor of Ancient History at the University of Edinburgh. He is the author of The Hellenistic Stoa: Political Thought and Action (1990) and Troy between Greece and Rome: Local Tradition and Imperial Power (2001). He is also the editor of A Companion to the Hellenistic World (2003) and A Companion to Ancient History (2009).

    Contributors

    D. H. Berry, Andrew Erskine, J. G. F. Powell, Catherine Steel, Glenys Davies, Christopher Craig, Andrew M. Riggsby, Roger Rees, Bruce Gibson, Anthony Corbeill, John T. Ramsey, Regine May, Carl Joachim Classen, Harry Hine, William W. Batstone, Christina Shuttleworth Kraus, Christopher Smith, Roland Mayer, A. J. Woodman

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