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Hunter-Gatherer Adaptation and Resilience
A Bioarchaeological Perspective

$99.99

Part of Cambridge Studies in Biological and Evolutionary Anthropology

Daniel H. Temple, Christopher M. Stojanowski, Susan Pfeiffer, Lesley Harrington, Valeria Bernal, S. Ivan Perez, María Bárbara Postillone, Diego D. Rindel, Rick J. Schulting, Michelle E. Cameron, Jay Stock, Pedro Da-Gloria, Lucas Bueno, Erin E. Bornemann, Lynn H. Gamble, Bryn Letham, Gary Coupland, Lauryn C. Justice, Eric J. Bartelink, Viviana I. Bellifemine, Irina Nechayev, Valerie A. Andrushko, Alan Leventhal, Robert Jurmian, Charles F. Merbs, Judith Littleton, Jane E. Buikstra
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  • Date Published: December 2018
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781107187351

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About the Authors
  • Hunter-gatherer lifestyles defined the origins of modern humans and for tens of thousands of years were the only form of subsistence our species knew. This changed with the advent of food production, which occurred at different times throughout the world. The chapters in this volume explore the different ways that hunter-gatherer societies around the world adapted to changing social and ecological circumstances while still maintaining a predominantly hunter-gatherer lifestyle. Couched specifically within the framework of resilience theory, the authors use contextualized bioarchaeological analyses of health, diet, mobility, and funerary practices to explore how hunter-gatherers responded to challenges and actively resisted change that diminished the core of their social identity and worldview.

    • Theorizes hunter-gatherers in bioarchaeological research as more than just a baseline stage in the evolution of human social complexity
    • Sees hunter-gatherers as complex humans with agency and distinct pasts
    • Provides a global perspective on hunter-gatherer lifestyles
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    Product details

    • Date Published: December 2018
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9781107187351
    • length: 404 pages
    • dimensions: 252 x 177 x 23 mm
    • weight: 0.95kg
    • contains: 80 b/w illus. 28 tables
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    1. Interrogating the alterity of hunter-gatherers in bioarchaeological context: adaptability, transformability and resilience of hunter-gatherers in the past Daniel H. Temple and Christopher M. Stojanowski
    2. Regional continuity and local challenges to resilience among holocene hunter-gatherers of the Greater Cape Floristic Region, South Africa Susan Pfeiffer and Lesley Harrington
    3. Hunter-gatherer persistence and demography in Patagonia (Southern South America): the impact of ecological changes during the Pleistocene and Holocene Valeria Bernal, S. Ivan Perez, María Bárbara Postillone and Diego D. Rindel
    4. The success and failure of resilience in the European Mesolithic Rick J. Schulting
    5. Persistence of time: resilience and adaptability in prehistoric Jomon hunter-gatherers from the inland sea region of Southwestern Honshu, Japan Daniel H. Temple
    6. Biomechanics, habitual activity, and resilience among Southern African hunter-gatherers and herders Michelle E. Cameron and Jay Stock
    7. Biocultural adaptation and resilience in the hunter-gatherers of Lagoa Santa, Central-Eastern Brazil Pedro Da-Gloria and Lucas Bueno
    8. Resiliency among hunter-gatherers in Southern California before and after European colonization: a bioarchaeological perspective Erin E. Bornemann and Lynn H. Gamble
    9. Persistence or pastoralim: the challenges of studying hunter-gatherer resilience in Africa Christopher M. Stojanowski
    10. Ancient mortuary ritual and cultural resilience on the northwest coast of North America Bryn Letham and Gary Coupland
    11. Bioarchaeological evidence for cultural resilience at Point Hope, Alaska: persistence and memory in the ontology of personhood in northern hunter-gatherers Lauryn C. Justice and Daniel H. Temple
    12. Biocultural perspectives on interpersonal violence in the prehistoric San Francisco Bay Area Eric J. Bartelink, Viviana I. Bellifemine, Irina Nechayev, Valerie A. Andrushko, Alan Leventhal and Robert Jurmian
    13. The discovery and rapid demise of the Sadlermiut Charles F. Merbs
    14. When resilience fails: fences, water control, and Aboriginal history in the Western Riverina, Australia Judith Littleton
    15. Models, metaphors, and measures Jane E. Buikstra.

  • Editors

    Daniel H. Temple, George Mason University, Virginia
    Daniel H. Temple is an Associate Professor of Anthropology at George Mason University. His research focuses on the life history, diet, mortuary ritual, and evolutionary morphology of hunter-gatherer populations from Northeast Asia and North America, specifically Japan, Siberia, Alaska, and Florida. He has published more than thirty peer-reviewed journal articles and book chapters on topics including growth and development, life history theory, enamel microstructures and stress, hunter-gatherer mortuary ritual, ecogeographic adaptation, functional adaptation, biodistance analysis, and prehistoric diet.

    Christopher M. Stojanowski, Arizona State University
    Christopher M. Stojanowski is a Professor of Anthropology at Arizona State University. He has written on diverse topics in anthropology including the bioarchaeology of colonial period peoples of south-eastern America, on early and middle Holocene populations of North Africa, and on dental anthropology and biological distance. His work is bioarchaeological in focus, specializing in the analysis of human remains and dentition. He has authored over sixty peer reviewed articles and chapters and has written three single authored books, one of which, The Bioarchaeology of Ethnogenesis in the Colonial Southeast (2010), was awarded the James Mooney Prize of the Southern Anthropological Society in 2010.

    Contributors

    Daniel H. Temple, Christopher M. Stojanowski, Susan Pfeiffer, Lesley Harrington, Valeria Bernal, S. Ivan Perez, María Bárbara Postillone, Diego D. Rindel, Rick J. Schulting, Michelle E. Cameron, Jay Stock, Pedro Da-Gloria, Lucas Bueno, Erin E. Bornemann, Lynn H. Gamble, Bryn Letham, Gary Coupland, Lauryn C. Justice, Eric J. Bartelink, Viviana I. Bellifemine, Irina Nechayev, Valerie A. Andrushko, Alan Leventhal, Robert Jurmian, Charles F. Merbs, Judith Littleton, Jane E. Buikstra

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