Skip to content
Register Sign in Wishlist

Insurrection and Intervention
The Two Faces of Sovereignty

$103.00

  • Author: Ned Dobos, University of New South Wales, Sydney
  • Date Published: October 2011
  • availability: Available
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9780521761130

$ 103.00
Hardback

Add to cart Add to wishlist

Other available formats:
Paperback, eBook


Looking for an inspection copy?

This title is not currently available for inspection. However, if you are interested in the title for your course we can consider offering an inspection copy. To register your interest please contact asiamktg@cambridge.org providing details of the course you are teaching.

Description
Product filter button
Description
Contents
Resources
Courses
About the Authors
  • Domestic sovereignty (the right of a government not to be resisted by its people) and international sovereignty (the moral immunity from outside intervention) have both been eroded in recent years, but the former to a much greater extent than the latter. An oppressed people's right to fight for liberal democratic reforms in their own country is treated as axiomatic, as the international responses to the revolutions in Tunisia, Egypt and Libya illustrate. But there is a reluctance to accept that foreign intervention is always justified in the same circumstances. Ned Dobos assesses the moral cogency of this double standard and asks whether intervention can be consistently and coherently opposed given our attitudes towards other kinds of political violence. His thought-provoking book will interest a wide range of readers in political philosophy and international relations.

    • Provides a comprehensive and systematic investigation into the philosophical and ethical dimensions of humanitarian intervention, which in many cases underpin the legal issues
    • Devotes considerable attention to the 'internal' legitimacy of humanitarian intervention - or whether it is consistent with the domestic obligations of the intervening state
    • Gives valuable insights into whether it is possible for Western governments to maintain an ethically sound relationship with their constituents, without compromising their standing as good global citizens by defaulting on their 'responsibility to protect' the victims of egregious human rights abuses abroad
    Read more

    Customer reviews

    Not yet reviewed

    Be the first to review

    Review was not posted due to profanity

    ×

    , create a review

    (If you're not , sign out)

    Please enter the right captcha value
    Please enter a star rating.
    Your review must be a minimum of 12 words.

    How do you rate this item?

    ×

    Product details

    • Date Published: October 2011
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9780521761130
    • length: 244 pages
    • dimensions: 236 x 160 x 17 mm
    • weight: 0.53kg
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction
    1. Communal self-determination
    2. Costs and consequences
    3. Asymmetries in jus ad bellum
    4. Asymmetries in jus in bello
    5. Humanitarian intervention and national responsibility
    6. The issue of selectivity
    7. Proper authority and international authorisation
    Conclusion.

  • Author

    Ned Dobos, University of New South Wales, Sydney
    Ned Dobos is Lecturer in Applied Ethics at the University of New South Wales and Adjunct Research Fellow at the Centre for Applied Philosophy and Public Ethics. He has published on various topics in political philosophy and applied ethics and serves as a peer-reviewer for an assortment of journals including Ethics and International Affairs, Political Studies, Nanoethics, the Australian Journal of Professional and Applied Ethics, the Human Rights Review and the Journal of Management and Strategy. He is also co-editor (with Christian Barry and Thomas Pogge) of Global Financial Crisis: The Ethical Issues, published by Palgrave Macmillan.

Sign In

Please sign in to access your account

Cancel

Not already registered? Create an account now. ×

Sorry, this resource is locked

Please register or sign in to request access. If you are having problems accessing these resources please email lecturers@cambridge.org

Register Sign in
Please note that this file is password protected. You will be asked to input your password on the next screen.

» Proceed

You are now leaving the Cambridge University Press website. Your eBook purchase and download will be completed by our partner www.ebooks.com. Please see the permission section of the www.ebooks.com catalogue page for details of the print & copy limits on our eBooks.

Continue ×

Continue ×

Continue ×

Find content that relates to you

Join us online

This site uses cookies to improve your experience. Read more Close

Are you sure you want to delete your account?

This cannot be undone.

Cancel

Thank you for your feedback which will help us improve our service.

If you requested a response, we will make sure to get back to you shortly.

×
Please fill in the required fields in your feedback submission.
×