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Relevance, Pragmatics and Interpretation

AUD$140.86 exc GST

Robyn Carston, Billy Clark, Kate Scott, Dan Sperber, Neil Smith, Nicholas Allott, Richard Breheny, Axel Barceló, Robert J. Stainton, Victoria Escandell-Vidal, Jacques Moeschler, Anne Reboul, Myrto Grigoroglou, Anna Papafragou, Mark Jary, Mikhail Kissine, Eun-Ju Noh, Diane Blakemore, Thorstein Fretheim, Anne Bezuidenhout, Eleni Gregoromichelaki, Ruth Kempson, Ingrid Lossius Falkum, Elly Ifantidou, Tomoko Matsui, Christoph Unger, Tim Wharton, Claudia Strey, Anne Furlong
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  • Publication planned for: September 2019
  • availability: Available
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781108418638

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  • Bringing together work by leading scholars in relevance theory, this volume showcases cutting-edge research within the theory, and demonstrates its influence across a range of fields including linguistics, pragmatics, philosophy of language, literary studies, developmental psychology and cognitive science. Organised into broad thematic strands that represent the latest research and debates, the volume shows the depth of analysis now possible after nearly forty years of intensive work in developing and applying the principles of relevance theory. The breadth of influence of the framework is reflected in the chapters of the volume, in some cases moving beyond the traditional realms of semantics and pragmatics to include discourse analysis, language acquisition, media and education. The volume will be essential reading for researchers in these fields, as well as for those already working within relevance theory or with other pragmatic theories.

    • Brings together in a single volume original research by leading scholars employing the relevance-theoretic framework
    • Presents new work on non-literal language use, including metaphor, metonymy, irony, allegory and free indirect speech
    • Includes chapters on children's pragmatic development, on the role of 'epistemic vigilance', on kinds of metarepresentation in comprehension, and on the role of emotion in communication
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    Reviews & endorsements

    'Three decades ago, relevance theory promised an exciting approach to the intricate relation between the linguistic and the extralinguistic. Putting pragmatics centre stage, the theory soon moved beyond Grice to develop into a whole new research programme. This volume provides rich evidence that relevance theory has made good on its promise.' Mira Ariel, Tel Aviv University

    'This is a glittering array of perspectives on communication and cognition. Readers familiar with relevance theory will discover an indispensable contribution to their library, and readers who are new to relevance theory will welcome the clarity and focus with which each of these short chapters offers new ways of thinking about language and thought.' Nigel Fabb, University of Strathclyde

    'This volume is a testament to relevance theory's impact and to its capacity to continually provide new insights with respect to communication and cognition.' Ira Noveck, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS)

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    Product details

    • Publication planned for: September 2019
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9781108418638
    • length: 326 pages
    • dimensions: 235 x 156 x 22 mm
    • weight: 0.61kg
    • contains: 1 b/w illus. 6 tables
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction Robyn Carston, Billy Clark and Kate Scott
    Reflections on the development of relevance theory
    Personal notes on a shared trajectory Dan Sperber
    The source of relevance Neil Smith
    Part I. Relevance Theory and Cognitive Communicative Issues:
    1. Scientific tractability and relevance theory Nicholas Allott
    2. Language processing, relevance and questions Richard Breheny
    3. Quasi-factives and cognitive efficiency Axel Barceló and Robert J. Stainton
    4. Evidential explicatures and mismatch resolution Victoria Escandell-Vidal
    5. Representation and metarepresentation in negation Jacques Moeschler
    6. Pronouns in free indirect discourse: a relevance-theoretic account Anne Reboul
    7. The development of pragmatic abilities Myrto Grigoroglou and Anna Papafragou
    Part II. Pragmatics and Linguistic Issues:
    8. Mood and the analysis of imperative sentences Mark Jary and Mikhail Kissine
    9. The Korean sentence-final Suffix ci as a metarepresentational marker Eun-Ju Noh
    10. Expressive epithets and expressive small clauses Diane Blakemore
    11. Ad Hoc concepts, polysemy and the lexicon Robyn Carston
    12. The polysemy of a Norwegian modal adverb Thorstein Fretheim
    13. Noun-noun compounds from the perspective of relevance theory Anne Bezuidenhout
    14. Procedural syntax Eleni Gregoromichelaki and Ruth Kempson
    Part III. Figurative Language and Layered Interpretations:
    15. Metaphor and metonymy in acquisition: a relevance-theoretic perspective Ingrid Lossius Falkum
    16. Relevance and metaphor understanding in a second language Elly Ifantidou
    17. Component processes of irony comprehension in children: epistemic vigilance, mind-reading and the search for relevance Tomoko Matsui
    18. Allegory in relation to metaphor and irony Christoph Unger
    19. Slave of the passions: making emotions relevant Tim Wharton and Claudia Strey
    20. Adaptations as communicative acts: a relevance-theoretic perspective Anne Furlong.

  • Editors

    Kate Scott, Kingston University, London
    Kate Scott is a Senior Lecturer in English Language and Linguistics at Kingston University, London. Her research focusses on the pragmatics of reference, with a special interest in the nature and role of procedural meaning.

    Billy Clark, Northumbria University, Newcastle
    Billy Clark is Professor of English Language and Linguistics at Northumbria University. His research covers a wide range of topics in linguistics and stylistics, with a particular focus on semantics and pragmatics.

    Robyn Carston, University College London
    Robyn Carston is Professor of Linguistics at University College London. Her main research interests are in pragmatics, semantics, relevance theory, metaphor, and word meaning.

    Contributors

    Robyn Carston, Billy Clark, Kate Scott, Dan Sperber, Neil Smith, Nicholas Allott, Richard Breheny, Axel Barceló, Robert J. Stainton, Victoria Escandell-Vidal, Jacques Moeschler, Anne Reboul, Myrto Grigoroglou, Anna Papafragou, Mark Jary, Mikhail Kissine, Eun-Ju Noh, Diane Blakemore, Thorstein Fretheim, Anne Bezuidenhout, Eleni Gregoromichelaki, Ruth Kempson, Ingrid Lossius Falkum, Elly Ifantidou, Tomoko Matsui, Christoph Unger, Tim Wharton, Claudia Strey, Anne Furlong

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