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Free and Unfree Labor in Atlantic and Indian Ocean Port Cities (1700–1850)

Free and Unfree Labor in Atlantic and Indian Ocean Port Cities (1700–1850)

$34.99

Part of International Review of Social History Supplements

Pepijn Brandon, Niklas Frykman, Pernille Røge, Matthias van Rossum, Kevin Dawson, Titas Chakraborty, Megan C. Thomas, Evelyn P. Jennings, Martine Jean, Clare Anderson, Melina Teubner, Marcus Rediker
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  • Date Published: June 2019
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9781108708562

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  • Colonial and post-colonial port cities in the Atlantic and Indian Ocean regions brought together laboring populations of many different backgrounds and statuses - legally free or semi-free wage-laborers, soldiers, sailors, and the self-employed, indentured servants, convicts, and slaves. From the seventeenth to the nineteenth century the labor of these 'motley crews' made port cities crucial hubs of the emerging capitalist world market and centers of imperial infrastructure. The nine chapters in this volume investigate the interaction between different groups of laborers around the docks and the neighborhoods that stretched behind them. How did the mixture of many different groups of laborers shape patterns of work and life, authority and control, exclusion and inclusion, group-competition and joint resistance? What roles did gender, race and status play in maintaining divisions or enabling solidarities? Together, the nine case studies present a vibrant picture of social relations and working-class cultures in port cities.

    • Explores free and unfree labor in port cities in the Atlantic and Indian Ocean through nine case studies
    • Presents a vibrant picture of the laboring populations of a diverse range of port cities, from pre-colonial Bengal to nineteenth-century Rio de Janeiro
    • From the seventeenth to the nineteenth century these laboring populations made port cities crucial hubs of the emerging capitalist world market and centers of imperial infrastructure
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    Product details

    • Date Published: June 2019
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9781108708562
    • length: 266 pages
    • dimensions: 229 x 152 x 12 mm
    • weight: 0.39kg
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction. Free and unfree labor in Atlantic and Indian Ocean port cities (seventeenth–nineteenth centuries) Pepijn Brandon, Niklas Frykman and Pernille Røge
    1. Labouring transformations of amphibious monsters: exploring early modern globalization, diversity, and shifting clusters of labour relations in the context of the Dutch East India Company (1600–1800) Matthias van Rossum
    2. History below the waterline: enslaved salvage divers harvesting seaports' hinter-seas in the early modern Atlantic Kevin Dawson
    3. The household workers of the East India Company ports of pre-colonial Bengal Titas Chakraborty
    4. Between the plantation and the port: racialization and social control in eighteenth-century Paramaribo Pepijn Brandon
    5. Securing trade: the military labor of the British occupation of Manila, 1762–1764 Megan C. Thomas
    6. The path to sweet success: free and unfree labor in the building of roads and rails in Havana, Cuba, 1790–1835 Evelyn P. Jennings
    7. Liberated Africans, slaves, and convict labor in the construction of Rio de Janeiro's Casa de Correção: Atlantic labor regimes and confinement in Brazil's port city Martine Jean
    8. Convicts, commodities, and connections in British Asia and the Indian Ocean, 1789–1866 Clare Anderson
    9. Street food, urban space, and gender: working on the streets of nineteenth-century Rio de Janeiro (1830–1870) Melina Teubner
    10. Afterword: reflections on the motley crew as port city proletariat Marcus Rediker.

  • Editors

    Pepijn Brandon, International Institute of Social History, Amsterdam

    Niklas Frykman, University of Pittsburgh

    Pernille Røge, University of Pittsburgh

    Contributors

    Pepijn Brandon, Niklas Frykman, Pernille Røge, Matthias van Rossum, Kevin Dawson, Titas Chakraborty, Megan C. Thomas, Evelyn P. Jennings, Martine Jean, Clare Anderson, Melina Teubner, Marcus Rediker

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