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Tax, Medicines and the Law
From Quackery to Pharmacy

$28.00 USD

  • Date Published: October 2017
  • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • format: Adobe eBook Reader
  • isbn: 9781108547925

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  • In 1783, a stamp duty was imposed on proprietary or 'quack' medicines. These largely useless but often dangerous remedies were immensely popular. The tax, which lasted until 1941, was imposed to raise revenue. It failed in its incidental regulatory purpose, had a negative effect in that the stamp was perceived as a guarantee of quality, and had a positive effect in encouraging disclosure of the formula. The book explains the considerable impact the tax had on chemists and druggists - how it led to an improvement in professional status, but undermined it by reinforcing their reputations as traders. The legislation imposing the tax was complex, ambiguous and never reformed. The tax authorities had to administer it, and executive practice came to dominate it. A minor, specialised, low-yield tax is shown to be of real significance in the pharmaceutical context, and of exceptional importance as a model revealing the wider impact of tax law and administration.

    • Demonstrates the role of tax law in other disciplines, providing a new perspective on law and tax, and the unintended impact of tax
    • Reveals tax as an unexplored area of medical history, presenting a novel perspective on the impact of tax law accessible to all audiences
    • Shows how a complex and unreformed tax, such as the medicine stamp duty, results in bureaucratic law making, highlighting the interface between law and government and the necessities of tax administration
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    Product details

    • Date Published: October 2017
    • format: Adobe eBook Reader
    • isbn: 9781108547925
    • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • Table of Contents

    1. Proprietary medicines and the fiscal state
    2. The medicine stamp duty and the authority of law
    3. The tax and the profession of pharmacy
    4. The tax and the integrity of medicines
    5. The demise of the tax.

  • Author

    Chantal Stebbings, University of Exeter
    Chantal Stebbings is Professor of Law and Legal History at the University of Exeter. In the past she has served as Dean of the Faculty of Law at the University of Exeter, Visiting Professor at the University of Rennes, France and a Fellow of the Institute of Taxation. She has also held a British Academy Research Readership and a Leverhulme Major Research Fellowship. She was generously supported by the Wellcome Trust for this book, which is her fourth monograph for Cambridge University Press. She is the Editor of the Journal of Legal History and the Chair of the Hamlyn Trust.

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