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Evolution and Development of Fishes

£95.00

Zerina Johanson, Martha Richter, Charlie Underwood, John A. Long, Brian Choo, Alice Clement, Tetsuto Miyashita, Stephen A. Green, Marianne E. Bronner, Ivan J. Sansom, Plamen Andreev, You-An Zhu, Per A. Ahlberg, Min Zhu, John G. Maisey, Philippe Janvier, Alan Pradel, John S. S. Denton, Allison Bronson, Randall Miller, Carole J. Burrow, Melanie Debiais-Thibaud, Brian K. Hall, P. Eckhard Witten, Gareth J. Fraser, Alex P. Thiery, Janine M. Ziermann, Rui Diogo, Jürgen Kriwet, Cathrin Pfaff, Kate Trinajstic, Catherine Boisvert, Fedor N. Shkil, Daria V. Kapitanova, Anthony Graham, Victoria Shone, Camilla Cupello, Gäel Clément, Paulo M. Brito
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  • Date Published: January 2019
  • availability: Temporarily unavailable - available from June 2019
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781107179448

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About the Authors
  • Fish, or lower vertebrates, occupy the basal nodes of the vertebrate phylogeny, and are therefore crucial in interpreting almost every feature of more advanced vertebrates, including amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals. Recent research focuses on combining evolutionary observations - primarily from the fish fossil record - with developmental data from living fishes, in order to better interpret evolutionary history and vertebrate phylogeny. This book highlights the importance of this research in the interpretation of vertebrate evolution, bringing together world-class palaeontologists and biologists to summarise the most interesting, current and cutting-edge topics in fish evolution and development. It will be an invaluable tool for researchers in early vertebrate palaeontology and evolution, and those particularly interested in the interface between evolution and development.

    • Presents the latest state-of-the-art evo-devo research on fish, from leading palaeontologists and biologists
    • Highlights the importance of fish evo-devo research for wider vertebrate evolution
    • Features new technologies, including CT-scanning
    • Contains contributions from recent studies on both fossil and modern fish
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    Product details

    • Date Published: January 2019
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9781107179448
    • length: 280 pages
    • dimensions: 283 x 224 x 18 mm
    • weight: 1.07kg
    • contains: 84 b/w illus.
    • availability: Temporarily unavailable - available from June 2019
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction Zerina Johanson, Martha Richter and Charlie Underwood
    1. The evolution of fishes through geological time John A. Long, Brian Choo and Alice Clement
    2. Comparative development of Cyclostomes Tetsuto Miyashita, Stephen A. Green and Marianne E. Bronner
    3. The ordovician enigma: fish, first appearances and phylogenetic controversies Ivan J. Sansom and Plamen Andreev
    4. The evolution of vertebrate dermal jaw bones in the light of maxillate placoderms You-An Zhu, Per A. Ahlberg and Min Zhu
    5. Doliodus and pucapampellids: contrasting perspectives on stem chondrichthyan morphology John G. Maisey, Philippe Janvier, Alan Pradel, John S. S. Denton, Allison Bronson, Randall Miller and Carole J. Burrow
    6. The evolution of endoskeletal mineralisation in chondrichthyan fish: development, cells and molecules Melanie Debiais-Thibaud
    7. Plasticity and variation of skeletal cells and tissues and the evolutionary development of actinopterygian fishes Brian K. Hall and P. Eckhard Witten
    8. Origin, development and evolution of the fish skull Martha Richter and Charlie Underwood
    9. Evolution, development and regeneration of fish dentitions Gareth J. Fraser and Alex P. Thiery
    10. Development of head muscles in fishes and notes on phylogeny-ontogeny links: a basis for evo-devo and developmental research on fish muscles Janine M. Ziermann and Rui Diogo
    11. Evolutionary development of the postcranial and appendicular skeleton in fishes Jürgen Kriwet and Cathrin Pfaff
    12. Evolution of vertebrate reproduction Kate Trinajstic, Catherine Boisvert, John A. Long and Zerina Johanson
    13. Links between thyroid hormone alterations and developmental changes in the evolution of the Weberian apparatus Fedor N. Shkil and Daria V. Kapitanova
    14. Pharyngeal remodelling in vertebrate evolution Anthony Graham and Victoria Shone
    15. Evolution of air breathing and lung distribution among fossil fishes Camilla Cupello, Gäel Clément and Paulo M. Brito
    Index.

  • Editors

    Zerina Johanson, Natural History Museum, London
    Zerina Johanson is a leading researcher in the field of early vertebrate evolutionary developmental biology ('Evo Devo'), combining palaeontological research with developmental studies on living animals. Her diverse research interests include the evolution and development of teeth and dentitions, vertebrate reproduction, paired appendages, and the axial skeleton. Dr Johanson has spoken at evo-devo symposia and has a strong commitment to supporting this research via her appointment to several journal editorial boards, and as a co-editor for volumes such as a special issue of the Journal of Anatomy on Vertebrate Evolution and Development (2013).

    Charlie Underwood, Birkbeck, University of London
    Charlie Underwood is a senior lecturer at Birkbeck, University of London with over 25 years of experience in research and teaching. His research has focused on fossil sharks and their relatives, as well as their geological and palaeoenvironmental context, and has expanded to include the formation of the teeth and skeleton of modern sharks and rays. He has published more than 70 scientific papers. Dr Underwood is an editor for the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology and has served on the committees of several other societies.

    Martha Richter, Natural History Museum, London
    Martha Richter has worked at the Natural History Museum in London for nearly 15 years, where she manages collections and curators and undertakes research on fossil fishes, with a focus on extinct Gondwanan ichthyofaunas. Previously, she was an associate professor at several Brazilian universities and head of the Laboratory of Palaeontology at the Museum of Sciences and Technology of the Pontifical Catholic University in Porto Alegre. She has published more than 60 papers and chapters in peer-reviewed journals and books, co-edited two Geological Association Special Publications, and acted as an editor for the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology.

    Contributors

    Zerina Johanson, Martha Richter, Charlie Underwood, John A. Long, Brian Choo, Alice Clement, Tetsuto Miyashita, Stephen A. Green, Marianne E. Bronner, Ivan J. Sansom, Plamen Andreev, You-An Zhu, Per A. Ahlberg, Min Zhu, John G. Maisey, Philippe Janvier, Alan Pradel, John S. S. Denton, Allison Bronson, Randall Miller, Carole J. Burrow, Melanie Debiais-Thibaud, Brian K. Hall, P. Eckhard Witten, Gareth J. Fraser, Alex P. Thiery, Janine M. Ziermann, Rui Diogo, Jürgen Kriwet, Cathrin Pfaff, Kate Trinajstic, Catherine Boisvert, Fedor N. Shkil, Daria V. Kapitanova, Anthony Graham, Victoria Shone, Camilla Cupello, Gäel Clément, Paulo M. Brito

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