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Morphological Change in Quaternary Mammals of North America

Morphological Change in Quaternary Mammals of North America

£103.00

Robert A. Martin, Anthony D. Barnosky, Deborah K. Anderson, Andrew P. Czebieniak, Tamar Dayan, Daniel Simberloff, Eitan Tchernov, Philip D. Gingerich, H. Thomas Goodwin, Richard C. Hulbert, Jr., Gary S. Morgan, Adrian M. Lister, Larry D. Martin, James R. Purdue, Elizabeth J. Reitz, John M. Rensberger, Kevin Seymour, Laurent Viriot, Jean Chaline, Andre Schaff, Eric Le Boulenge, Richard J. Zakrzewski
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  • Date Published: December 1993
  • availability: Available
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9780521404501

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  • This 1993 book examines case studies of North American Quaternary mammalian evolution within the larger domain of evolutionary theory. It presents studies of a variety of taxa (xenarthrans, rodents, carnivores, ungulates) examined over several temporal scales, from a few thousand years during the Holocene to millions of years of late Pliocene and Pleistocene time. Different organisational levels are represented, from mosaic population variation, to a synopsis of Quaternary evolution of an entire order (Rodentia). The book also includes purely theoretical and methodological contributions, for example, on the statistical recognition of stasis in the fossil record, ways to calculate evolutionary rates, and the use of digital image analysis in the study of dental ontogeny. Perhaps the most important aspect of the studies reported in this book is that they span the time between the 'ecological moment' and 'deep time'. The book will interest vertebrate palaeontologists, ecologists concerned with the origin of biological diversity and also evolutionists interested in the competing evolutionary models.

    • The studies reported in this book span the time between the 'ecological moment' and 'deep time'
    • Will interest vertebrate paleontologists, ecologists and evolutionists
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    Product details

    • Date Published: December 1993
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9780521404501
    • length: 428 pages
    • dimensions: 229 x 152 x 24 mm
    • weight: 0.74kg
    • contains: 111 b/w illus. 36 tables
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    1. Quaternary mammals and evolutionary theory: introductory remarks and historical perspective Robert A. Martin and Anthony D. Barnosky
    2. A method for recognizing morphological stasis Deborah K. Anderson
    3. Mosaic evolution at the population level in Microtus pennsylvanicus Anthony D. Barnosky
    4. Variogram analysis of paleontological data Andrew P. Czebieniak
    5. Morphological change in quaternary mammals: a role for species interactions? Tamar Dayan, Daniel Simberloff and Eitan Tchernov
    6. Rates of evolution in Plio-Pleistocene mammals: six case studies Philip D. Gingerich
    7. Patterns of dental variation and evolution in prairie dogs, genus Cynomys H. Thomas Goodwin
    8. Quantitative and qualitative evolution in the giant armadillo Holmesina (Edentata: Pampatheriidae) in Florida Richard C. Hulbert, Jr. and Gary S. Morgan
    9. Evolution of mammoths and moose: the holarctic perspective Adrian M. Lister
    10. Evolution of hypsodonty and enamel structure in Plio-Pleistocene rodents Larry D. Martin
    11. Patterns of variation and speciation in Quaternary rodents Robert A. Martin
    12. Decrease in the body size of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) during the late Holocene in South Carolina and Georgia James R. Purdue and Elizabeth J. Reitz
    13. Short-term fluctuations in small mammals of the late Pleistocene from Eastern Washington John M. Rensberger and Anthony D. Barnosky
    14. Size change in North American Quaternary jaguars Kevin Seymour
    15. Ontogenetic change of Ondatra zibethicus (Arvicolidae, Rodentia) cheek teeth analyzed by digital image processing Laurent Viriot, Jean Chaline, Andre Schaff and Eric Le Boulenge
    16. Morphological change in woodrat (Rodentia: Cricetidae) molars Richard J. Zakrzewski
    Index.

  • Editors

    Robert A. Martin, Berry College, Georgia

    Anthony D. Barnosky, University of California, Berkeley

    Contributors

    Robert A. Martin, Anthony D. Barnosky, Deborah K. Anderson, Andrew P. Czebieniak, Tamar Dayan, Daniel Simberloff, Eitan Tchernov, Philip D. Gingerich, H. Thomas Goodwin, Richard C. Hulbert, Jr., Gary S. Morgan, Adrian M. Lister, Larry D. Martin, James R. Purdue, Elizabeth J. Reitz, John M. Rensberger, Kevin Seymour, Laurent Viriot, Jean Chaline, Andre Schaff, Eric Le Boulenge, Richard J. Zakrzewski

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