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Look Inside Gynecologic and Urologic Pathology

Gynecologic and Urologic Pathology
Similarities, Differences and Challenges

£140.00 (+VAT)

Paola Castrogiovanni, Giuseppe Musumeci, Rosa Imbesi, Emanula D'Angelo, Jaume Prat, Manuel Nistal, Pilar González-Peramato, Maria Rosaria Raspollini, Ilaria Montagnani, Rodolfo Montironi, Antonio Lopez-Beltran, Roberta Mazzucchelli, Silvia Gasparrini, Andrea B. Galosi, Liang Cheng, Marina Scarpelli, Gladell P. Paner, Ferran Algaba, Vicente Peg, Anna Caliò, Diego Segala, Guido Martignoni, Sigurd F. Lax, Xavier Matias-Guiu, Enric Condom, David S. Priemer, Robert E. Emerson, Sean R. Williamson, Maria R. Raspollini, Adela Saco, Natalia Rakislova, Carla Carrilho, Jaume Ordi, Maurizio Colecchia, Alessia Bertolotti, Tullio Torelli, Priyadharsini Nagarajan, Elizabeth D. Euscher, Pheroze Tamboli, Victor G. Prieto
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  • Date Published: February 2019
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Print/online bundle
  • isbn: 9781107170452

£ 140.00 (+VAT)
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About the Authors
  • Due to common early development, the pathology of the urogenital tract in males and females present many similarities. Richly illustrated in colour throughout, this essential text evaluates the most common pathologies of the male and female urogenital tract, focussing on similarities, differences, and challenges. Images are colour coded by gender, and feature diagnostic algorithms and boxes highlighting key similarities and differences. This book is intended to bridge the gap between urologic and gynecologic specialties, whose diagnoses are rarely considered or studied together. Understanding common development, similarities and differences is extremely valuable for the evaluation of pathologic features and related dysfunctions. This comprehensive resource will be invaluable to urological and gynaecological pathologists,residents, general pathologists, and for consultants in urology and gynaecology to gain experience in the pathologic diagnostic rationale. This book provides entry to an online version on Cambridge Core, which can be accessed via the code printed on the inside of the cover.

    • Contains colour-coded images to highlight traits present in male and female organs, as well as highlight features present in both
    • Bridges the gap between urologic and gynaecologic pathology specialities to highlight key common similarities to aid with diagnoses
    • Includes entry to an HTML version of the text on Cambridge Core, providing high-resolution access to the large number of high quality colour figures
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    Product details

    • Date Published: February 2019
    • format: Print/online bundle
    • isbn: 9781107170452
    • length: 428 pages
    • dimensions: 284 x 225 x 24 mm
    • weight: 1.75kg
    • contains: 262 colour illus. 55 tables
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    Part I. Notes on Embryology, Differentiation, and Function of the Uro-Genital Tract:
    1. Embryonic development of the urinary system
    2. Indifferent embryonic development (pre-sex determination)
    3. Male
    4. Female
    Part II. Ovary and Testis: Similarities and Differences:
    5. Non-neoplastic and tumor-like conditions of the ovary
    6. Non-neoplastic and tumor-like conditions of the testis
    7. Disorders of sexual development
    8. Ovarian epithelial-stromal tumors and similar lesions in the testis
    9. Germ cell tumors: the ovary and the testis
    10. Sex-cord stromal tumors: the ovary and the testis
    Part III. Prostatic Lesions and Tumors:
    11. The prostatic utriculus and endometrioid prostate cancer
    12. Cystic lesions of the prostate and lower genitourinary tract versus female gynecologic tract lesions: similarities and differences
    13. Biphasic tumors of the urogenital tract: selected topics
    14. Ectopic prostatic tissue
    15. Mesonephric remnants
    16. Prostate and breast pathology: similarities and differences
    Part IV. Kidney Tumors and Neoplasms with Similar Features in the Gynaecological Tract:
    17. Clear cell tumors of the kidney and clear cell tumors of the gynecological tract
    18. Mixed epithelial and stromal tumors of the kidney
    19. Mixed epithelial and mesenchymal tumors of the uterus
    20. Ovarian mixed epithelial-stromal tumors
    21. Mesenchymal tumors of the kidney
    22. Mesenchymal tumors of the female genital tract
    Part V. Neuroendocrine Tumors:
    23. Similarities and differences in neuroendocrine tumors of the male and female genital tracts and urinary tract
    Part VI. Transitional Cell Tumors:
    24. Brenner tumors and transitional cell tumors of the ovary
    25. Transitional cell tumors of the bladder
    26. Squamotransitional carcinoma and transitional cell metaplasia of the cervix and the vagina, and squamous cell carcinoma and squamous lesions of the urinary tract
    27. Micropapillary urothelial carcinoma of the bladder versus gynaecological tract carcinomas with micropapillary features: similarities and differences
    Part VII. Urethra and Non-transitional Tumor of the Bladder:
    28. Pathology of female and male urethra
    29. Bladder mullerian lesions: endometriosis, endosalpingiosis, endocervicosis, and mullerianosis
    30. Clear cell carcinoma of the urinary tract versus clear cell carcinoma of the ovary: similarities and differences
    31. Cystic and solid tumors of the urachus versus gynecologic tract tumors: similarities and differences
    Part VIII. Vulva and Penis:
    32. Dermatoses and inflammatory diseases of the vulva
    33. Dermatoses and inflammatory diseases of the penis
    34. Intraepithelial lesions of the vulva
    35. Intraepithelial lesions of the penis
    36. Malignant neoplasms of the vulva and the penis
    37. Miscellaneous lesions of the vulva and the penis
    Part IX. Secondary Tumors:
    38. Secondary tumors of the male and female genital tracts and urinary tract: similarities and differences.

  • Editors

    Maria Rosaria Raspollini, University Hospital Careggi, Florence
    Maria Rosaria Raspollini is a consultant pathologist at the Department of Histopathology and Molecular Diagnostics at the University Hospital Careggi of Florence, Italy. Her expertise and research activity has been focussed on gynaecological and urological pathology.

    Antonio Lopez-Beltran, Cordoba University Medical School
    Antonio Lopez-Beltran is Professor of Anatomic Pathology, and the Director of the Service of Anatomic Pathology at the Champalimaud Clinical Center in Lisbon, Portugal.

    Contributors

    Paola Castrogiovanni, Giuseppe Musumeci, Rosa Imbesi, Emanula D'Angelo, Jaume Prat, Manuel Nistal, Pilar González-Peramato, Maria Rosaria Raspollini, Ilaria Montagnani, Rodolfo Montironi, Antonio Lopez-Beltran, Roberta Mazzucchelli, Silvia Gasparrini, Andrea B. Galosi, Liang Cheng, Marina Scarpelli, Gladell P. Paner, Ferran Algaba, Vicente Peg, Anna Caliò, Diego Segala, Guido Martignoni, Sigurd F. Lax, Xavier Matias-Guiu, Enric Condom, David S. Priemer, Robert E. Emerson, Sean R. Williamson, Maria R. Raspollini, Adela Saco, Natalia Rakislova, Carla Carrilho, Jaume Ordi, Maurizio Colecchia, Alessia Bertolotti, Tullio Torelli, Priyadharsini Nagarajan, Elizabeth D. Euscher, Pheroze Tamboli, Victor G. Prieto

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