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The African Court of Justice and Human and Peoples' Rights in Context

The African Court of Justice and Human and Peoples' Rights in Context
Development and Challenges

Kamari M. Clarke, Charles C. Jalloh, Vincent O. Nmehielle, George Mukundi Wachira, Tim Murithi, Erika De Wet, Adam Branch, Daniel D. Ntanda Nsereko, Manuel J. Ventura, Hannibal Travis, Sergey Sayapin, Neil Boister, Douglas Guilfoyle, Rob McLaughlin, Ben Saul, José L. Gómez del Prado, John Hatchard, Cecily Rose, Tomoya Obokata, Matiangai Sirleaf, Daniëlla Dam, James G. Stewart, Harmen van der Wilt, Margaret M. deGuzman, Melinda Taylor, Dire Tladi, Wayne Jordash, Natacha Bracq, Joanna Kyriakakis, Chile Eboe-Osuji, Sara Wharton, Mark A. Drumbl, Godfrey M. Musila, Rachel Murray, Pacifique Manirakiza, Edwin Bikundo, Adejoké Babington-Ashaye, Stuart Ford, Netsanet Belay
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  • Publication planned for: August 2019
  • availability: Available
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781108422734

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About the Authors
  • The treaty creating the African Court of Justice and Human and Peoples' Rights, if and when it comes into force, contains innovative elements that have potentially significant implications for current substantive and procedural approaches to regional and international dispute settlements. Bringing together leading authorities in international criminal law, human rights and transitional justice, this volume provides the first comprehensive analysis of the 'Malabo Protocol' while situating it within the wider fields of international law and international relations. The book, edited by Professors Jalloh, Clarke and Nmehielle, offers scholarly, empirical, critically engaged and practical analyses of some of its most challenging provisions. Breaking new ground on the African Court, but also treating old concepts in a novel and relevant way, The African Court of Justice and Human and Peoples' Rights in Context is for anyone interested in international law, including international criminal law and international human rights law. This title is also available as Open Access on Cambridge Core.

    • Offers in-depth analysis of the unprecedented merger of three types of jurisdiction contained in the Malabo Protocol in a single court
    • Assembles leading scholars, practitioners and experts to situate the future African Court within the wider international legal context
    • This title is also available as Open Access
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    Product details

    • Publication planned for: August 2019
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9781108422734
    • length: 1194 pages
    • dimensions: 235 x 156 x 59 mm
    • weight: 1.01kg
    • contains: 3 b/w illus. 7 tables
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Part I. The Wider Context of Transitional Justice and Accountability in Africa and The Place of The African Court of Justice and Human and Peoples' Rights
    Part II. The Criminal Law Jurisdiction of the African Court
    Part III. The Human Rights Jurisdiction of the African Court
    Part IV. The General Jurisdiction of the African Court
    Part V. Funding The African Court and The Role of Civil Society.

  • Editors

    Charles C. Jalloh, Florida International University
    Charles C. Jalloh is Professor of Law at Florida International University, a member of the United Nations International Law Commission, and Founding Director of the African Court Research Initiative (ACRI). He has published extensively on aspects of international law and is founding editor of the African Journal of Legal Studies and the African Journal of International Criminal Justice.

    Kamari M. Clarke, University of California, Los Angeles
    Kamari M. Clarke is Professor at the University of California, Los Angeles and co-director of the African Court Research Initiative funded by the Open Society Foundations. Specializing in international law and legal anthropology, she has held numerous fellowships and grants and has distinguished her career with eight books and over forty book chapters and articles and research excellence awards.

    Vincent O. Nmehielle, The African Development Bank
    Vincent O. Nmehielle is the Secretary-General of the African Development Bank Group. He is a former Legal Counsel and Director for Legal Affairs of the African Union; a former Professor of Law and Head of the Wits Programme on Law, Justice and Development in Africa, University of the Witwatersrand School, Johannesburg, South Africa; a former Professorial Lecturer in law at the Oxford University and George Washington University Human Rights Programe and a former Principal Defender of the United Nations-Backed Special Court for Sierra Leone.

    Contributors

    Kamari M. Clarke, Charles C. Jalloh, Vincent O. Nmehielle, George Mukundi Wachira, Tim Murithi, Erika De Wet, Adam Branch, Daniel D. Ntanda Nsereko, Manuel J. Ventura, Hannibal Travis, Sergey Sayapin, Neil Boister, Douglas Guilfoyle, Rob McLaughlin, Ben Saul, José L. Gómez del Prado, John Hatchard, Cecily Rose, Tomoya Obokata, Matiangai Sirleaf, Daniëlla Dam, James G. Stewart, Harmen van der Wilt, Margaret M. deGuzman, Melinda Taylor, Dire Tladi, Wayne Jordash, Natacha Bracq, Joanna Kyriakakis, Chile Eboe-Osuji, Sara Wharton, Mark A. Drumbl, Godfrey M. Musila, Rachel Murray, Pacifique Manirakiza, Edwin Bikundo, Adejoké Babington-Ashaye, Stuart Ford, Netsanet Belay

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