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Ultrahigh Pressure Metamorphism

$64.00 USD

Part of Cambridge Topics in Petrology

  • Date Published: April 2011
  • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • format: Adobe eBook Reader
  • isbn: 9780511882005

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  • Recent discoveries of diamond and coesite in the upper crustal rocks of the Earth have drastically changed scientists' ideas concerning the limits of crustal metamorphism. This book provides detailed accounts of the discoveries of diamond and coesite in crustal rocks and provides insights regarding their formation at very high pressures. The formation of these minerals is related to subduction and continental collision and the tectonics, petrological and mineralogical conditions of diamond and coesite formation are each discussed. Written by the leading workers in this exciting field, this book attempts to define an entirely new field of metamorphism - ultrahigh pressure metamorphism (UHPM). In doing so, it explains the formation of ultrahigh pressure minerals and explores new ideas regarding the tectonic setting of this style of metamorphism. This book will be of particular interest to researchers and graduate students of metamorphic petrology and global tectonics.

    • This books helps define a new field of metamorphism
    • Describes mineralogical and petrological characteristics of UHPM
    • Examines new ideas regarding the plate tectonic setting of UHPM
    • Level: graduates and researchers
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    Product details

    • Date Published: April 2011
    • format: Adobe eBook Reader
    • isbn: 9780511882005
    • contains: 78 b/w illus. 24 tables
    • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • Table of Contents

    1. Overview of the geology and tectonics of UHPM
    2. Experimental and petrogenetic study of UHPM
    3. Principal mineralogical indicators of ultrahigh pressure in crustal rocks
    4. Structures in ultrahigh pressure metamorphic rocks: a case study from the Alps
    5. Creation, preservation, and exhumation of ultrahigh pressure metamorphic rocks
    6. The role of serpentinite melanges in the unroofing of ultrahigh pressure metamorphic rocks: An example from the Western Alps of Italy
    7. Ultrahigh pressure metamorphic rocks in Western Alps
    8. High and ultrahigh pressure eclogites and garnet peridotites in the Scandinavian Caledonides
    9. Microcoesites and microdiamonds in Norway: a brief review
    10. Ultrahigh pressure metamorphic terrane in Eastern Central China
    11. A model for the tectonic history of the high and ultrahigh pressure metamorphic region in East Central China
    12. Diamond-bearing metamorphic rocks of the Kokchetav Massif
    13. Orogenic ultramafic rocks of ultrahigh pressure (diamond facies) origin.

  • Editors

    Robert G. Coleman, Stanford University, California

    Xiaomin Wang, Stanford University, California

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