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Bach Studies

Bach Studies

£29.99

Robert L. Marshall, George J. Buelow, Stephen A. Criss, Paul Brainard, Eric T Chafe, Alfred Mann, Russell Stinson, George B. Stauffer, Peter Williams, Brick Siegele, James A. Brokaw II, Don O. Franklin, Ludwig Finscher, Martin Zenck, Gerhard Herz
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  • Date Published: October 2008
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9780521088329

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About the Authors
  • This volume of essays reflects the increasing breadth and scope of Bach research. The fifteen essays by American and European scholars address a wide range of topics and issues: Magnificat, Cantata, and Passion; Parody and Genre; The Well-Tempered Clavier; and Transmission and Reception. Many of the authors focus on works which due to the Bach chronology - can now be examined in a fresh light. Seen as a whole, the essays combine source - critical and analytic methods with historical and theological interpretation to consider problems of genesis and style, as well as questions of transmission and reception.

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    Product details

    • Date Published: October 2008
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9780521088329
    • length: 380 pages
    • dimensions: 229 x 152 x 21 mm
    • weight: 0.56kg
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Part I. Magnificat, Cantata and Passion:
    1. On the origin of Bach's Magnificat: a Lutheran composer's challenge Robert L. Marshall
    2. Expressivity in the accompanied recitatives of Bach's cantatas George J. Buelow
    3. Aria forms in the Cantatas from Bach's first Leipzig Jahrgang Stephen A. Criss
    4. The regulative and generative roles of verse in Bach's 'thematic' invention Paul Brainard
    5. The St John Passion: theology and musical stricture Eric T Chafe
    Part II. Parody and genre:
    6. Bach's parody technique and its frontiers Alfred Mann
    7. Three organ-trio transcriptions from the Bach circle: keys to a lost Bach chamber work Russell Stinson
    8. 'This fantasia... never had its like': on the enigma and chronology of Bach's Chromatic Fantasia and Fugue in D Minor, BWV 903 George B. Stauffer
    9. French overture conventions in the hands of the young Bach and Handel Peter Williams
    Part III. The Well-Tempered Clavier I and II:
    10. The four conceptual stages of the Fugue in C Minor, WTC I Brick Siegele
    11. The genesis of the Prelude in C Major, BWV 870 James A. Brokaw II
    12. Reconstructing the Urpartitur for WTC II: a study of the "London autograph" (BL Add. MS 35021) Don O. Franklin
    Part IV. Transmission and reception: Bach in the eighteenth century Ludwig Finscher
    13. Tradition as authority and provocation: Anton Weburn's confrontation with Johann Sebastian Bach Martin Zenck
    14. The human side of the American Bach sources Gerhard Herz.

  • Author

    Don O. Franklin

    Contributors

    Robert L. Marshall, George J. Buelow, Stephen A. Criss, Paul Brainard, Eric T Chafe, Alfred Mann, Russell Stinson, George B. Stauffer, Peter Williams, Brick Siegele, James A. Brokaw II, Don O. Franklin, Ludwig Finscher, Martin Zenck, Gerhard Herz

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