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Event History Modeling
A Guide for Social Scientists

£32.99

Part of Analytical Methods for Social Research

  • Date Published: June 2004
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9780521546737

£ 32.99
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About the Authors
  • Event History Modeling, first published in 2004, provides an accessible guide to event history analysis for researchers and advanced students in the social sciences. The substantive focus of many social science research problems leads directly to the consideration of duration models, and many problems would be better analyzed by using these longitudinal methods to take into account not only whether the event happened, but when. The foundational principles of event history analysis are discussed and ample examples are estimated and interpreted using standard statistical packages, such as STATA and S-Plus. Critical innovations in diagnostics are discussed, including testing the proportional hazards assumption, identifying outliers, and assessing model fit. The treatment of complicated events includes coverage of unobserved heterogeneity, repeated events, and competing risks models. The authors point out common problems in the analysis of time-to-event data in the social sciences and make recommendations regarding the implementation of duration modeling methods.

    • Accessible to social science audiences who are interested in event history modeling (which is also referred to as survival, duration, and reliability modeling)
    • Incorporates the latest research
    • Extensive social science examples, along with code in popularly used programs
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    Product details

    • Date Published: June 2004
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9780521546737
    • length: 234 pages
    • dimensions: 229 x 150 x 8 mm
    • weight: 0.36kg
    • contains: 18 b/w illus. 36 tables
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    List of figures
    List of tables
    Preface
    1. Event history and political analysis
    2. The logic of event history analysis
    3. Parametric models for single-spell duration data
    4. The Cox Proportional Hazards model
    5. Models for discrete data
    6. Issues in model selection
    7. Inclusion of time-varying covariates
    8. Diagnostic methods for the event history model
    9. Some modeling strategies for unobserved heterogeneity
    10. Models for multiple events
    11. Political analysis and event history
    Appendix: software for event history analysis
    References
    Index.

  • Authors

    Janet M. Box-Steffensmeier, Ohio State University
    Janet Box-Steffensmeier is Vernal Riffe Professor of Political Science at Ohio State University. Chair of the R. H. Durr Award Committee for the best paper applying quantitative methods to a substantive issue that was presented at the 2002 Annual Meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association, 2002–3. Vice President and member of the Executive Committee of the Political Methodology Section of the American Political Science Association, 2003–5.

    Bradford S. Jones, University of Arizona
    Bradford S. Jones is an Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Arizona. He has served as a Section Officer for the Society for Political Methodology as well as serving as a guest editor for a special issue of Political Analysis on causal inference. His research on methodology includes work on reliability analysis, duration modeling, and models for categorical data. Professor Jones received his Ph.D. from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. Apart from methodology, Professor Jones' research interests include racial and ethnic politics, public opinion, and representation.

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