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John Keats in Context

Part of Literature in Context

Sarah Wootton, Nicholas Roe, Hrileena Ghosh, Heidi Thomson, Shahidha Bari, Jeffrey C. Robinson, Madeleine Callaghan, John Barnard, Gregory Leadbetter, Timothy Webb, Richard Cronin, Grant F. Scott, Nancy Moore Goslee, Anthony John Harding, Porscha Fermanis, Duncan Wu, Charles W. Mahoney, Seamus Perry, Stacey McDowell, Michael O'Neill, Chris Murray, Beth Lau, Jane Stabler, Andrew Bennett, Susan J. Wolfson, Christopher R. Miller, Herbert F. Tucker, Mark Sandy, Kelvin Everest, Francis O'Gorman, Matthew Scott, Richard Marggraf Turley
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  • Date Published: June 2017
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781107070554

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  • John Keats (1795–1821) continues to delight and challenge readers both within and beyond the academic community through his poems and letters. This volume provides frameworks for enhanced analysis and appreciation of Keats and his work, with each chapter supplying a succinct, informed, and accessible account of a particular topic. Leading scholars examine the life and work of Keats against the backdrop of his influences, contemporaries, and reception, and explore the interaction of poet and world. The essays consider his enduring but ever-altering appeal, engage with critical discussion and debate, and offer revisionary close reading of the poems and letters. Students and specialists will find their knowledge of Keats's life and work enriched by chapters that survey subjects ranging from education, relationships, and religion to art, genre, and film.

    • Covers a vast range of topics, taking a fresh look at the mutual exchange of influence between the poet and his world
    • Concise and incisive chapters by leading names in the field will appeal to specialists as well as students
    • Keeps the poems at the forefront of the contextual picture, enabling enhanced analysis and appreciation of Keats's work
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    Reviews & endorsements

    'For new readers of Keats, the problem is staying abreast of 200 fertile years of reviews, criticism and biographies. John Keats in Context works as a curative. The final four essays on reception and Keats scholarship from 1821 to the present (by Kelvin Everest, Francis O'Gorman, Matthew Scott and Richard Marggraf Turley) are essential reading … In O'Neill's volume, Keats is prevented from settling into a single mode - medical student, cultural observer, reader, philosopher, liberal, friend, nurse, lover - but rather given space to exhibit these fluctuations. The strongest essays follow Keats through critical dicta into less settled territory.' Christy Edwall, The Times Literary Supplement

    'Michael O'Neill's edited collection of essays presents very succinct statements on different aspects of Keats's life and writings … The need for brevity enforces on the writers a compressed succinctness, and the length of each essay is perfect for reading on a half-hour bus journey (I speak from experience). … The diversity and depth of Keats's involvement in the many contexts represented in O'Neill's excellent collection stimulate reflections on the multi-faceted poet's other interests and influences … Michael O'Neill and his team in this handsome and well-conceived volume … have done Keats proud by giving him the contexts which well and truly position him where he wished to be, 'among the English Poets'.' R. S. White, European Romantic Review

    'This collection of scholarly reassessments in the interests of 'a full-scale reconsideration of Keats's achievement and its enabling contexts' … comprises thirty-four short chapters of around ten pages each, organized into six parts: 'Life, Letters, Texts'; 'Cultural Contexts'; 'Ideas and Poetics'; 'Poetic Contexts'; 'Influence'; and 'Critical Reception'.' William Christie, The Review of English Studies

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    Product details

    • Date Published: June 2017
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9781107070554
    • length: 388 pages
    • dimensions: 235 x 160 x 22 mm
    • weight: 0.76kg
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    Part I. Life, Letters, Texts:
    1. Biographies and film Sarah Wootton
    2. Formative years and medical training Nicholas Roe and Hrileena Ghosh
    3. Surgery, science and suffering Nicholas Roe
    4. Fanny Brawne and other women Heidi Thomson
    5. Mortality Shahidha Bari
    6. Travel Jeffrey C. Robinson
    7. Letters Madeleine Callaghan
    8. Manuscripts and publishing history John Barnard
    Part II. Cultural Contexts:
    9. The Hunt circle and the Cockney School Gregory Leadbetter
    10. London Timothy Webb
    11. Politics Richard Cronin
    12. Sociability Grant F. Scott
    13. The visual and plastic arts Nancy Moore Goslee
    14. Religion and myth Anthony John Harding
    Part III. Ideas and Poetics:
    15. The Enlightenment and history Porscha Fermanis
    16. Keats and Hazlitt Duncan Wu
    17. Imagination, beauty and truth Charles W. Mahoney
    18. The poetical character Seamus Perry
    19. The senses and sensation Stacey McDowell
    20. Prosody and versification in the Odes Michael O'Neill
    Part IV. Poetic Contexts:
    21. Poetic precursors (1): Dante and Shakespeare Chris Murray
    22. Poetic precursors (2): Spenser, Milton, Dryden, Pope Beth Lau
    23. Contemporaries (1) (and immediate predecessors): Tighe, Radcliffe, Southey, Burns, Chatterton, Hunt, Wordsworth Michael O'Neill
    24. Contemporaries (2): Coleridge, Byron, Shelley Jane Stabler
    25. Ballad, romance and narrative Andrew Bennett
    26. Epic and tragedy Susan J. Wolfson
    27. Lyrical genres Christopher R. Miller
    Part V. Influence:
    28. Tennyson to Wilde Herbert F. Tucker
    29. Hardy, Edward Thomas, Stevens, Bishop, Heaney Michael O'Neill
    30. American writing Mark Sandy
    Part VI. Critical Reception:
    31. Contemporary reviews Kelvin Everest
    32 Critical reception, 1821–1900 Francis O'Gorman
    33. Keats criticism, 1900–63 Matthew Scott
    34. Keats criticism, post-1963 Richard Marggraf Turley.

  • Editor

    Michael O'Neill, University of Durham
    Michael O'Neill is Professor of English at the University of Durham, and has published widely on Romantic, Victorian, and twentieth-century poetry. His works include The Human Mind's Imaginings: Conflict and Achievement in Shelley's Poetry (1989), Romanticism and the Self- Conscious Poem (1997), and The All-Sustaining Air (2007), and, as editor, The Cambridge History of English Poetry (Cambridge, 2010). He is also the co-author (with Michael D. Hurley) of Poetic Form (Cambridge, 2012) and the co-editor (with Anthony Howe and with the assistance of Madeleine Callaghan) of The Oxford Handbook of Percy Bysshe Shelley (2013). His latest collection of poems is Gangs of Shadow (2014).

    Contributors

    Sarah Wootton, Nicholas Roe, Hrileena Ghosh, Heidi Thomson, Shahidha Bari, Jeffrey C. Robinson, Madeleine Callaghan, John Barnard, Gregory Leadbetter, Timothy Webb, Richard Cronin, Grant F. Scott, Nancy Moore Goslee, Anthony John Harding, Porscha Fermanis, Duncan Wu, Charles W. Mahoney, Seamus Perry, Stacey McDowell, Michael O'Neill, Chris Murray, Beth Lau, Jane Stabler, Andrew Bennett, Susan J. Wolfson, Christopher R. Miller, Herbert F. Tucker, Mark Sandy, Kelvin Everest, Francis O'Gorman, Matthew Scott, Richard Marggraf Turley

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