Skip to content
Register Sign in Wishlist

Everyday Words and the Character of Prose in Nineteenth-Century Britain

Part of Cambridge Studies in Nineteenth-Century Literature and Culture

  • Date Published: February 2019
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9781316632789

Paperback

Add to wishlist

Other available formats:
Hardback, eBook


Looking for an inspection copy?

This title is not currently available on inspection

Description
Product filter button
Description
Contents
Resources
Courses
About the Authors
  • Everyday Words and the Character of Prose in Nineteenth-Century Britain is an original and innovative study of the stylistic tics of canonical novelists including Austen, Dickens, Trollope, Thackeray and Eliot. Jonathan Farina shows how ordinary locutions such as 'a decided turn', 'as if' and 'that sort of thing' condense nineteenth-century manners, tacit aesthetics and assumptions about what counts as knowledge. Writers recognized these recurrent 'everyday words' as signatures of 'character'. Attending to them reveals how many of the fundamental forms of characterizing fictional characters also turn out to be forms of characterizing objects, natural phenomena and inanimate, abstract things, such as physical laws, the economy and legal practice. Ultimately, this book revises what 'character' meant to nineteenth-century Britons by respecting the overlapping, transdisciplinary connotations of the category.

    • Demonstrates the importance of critically neglected turns of phrase in nineteenth-century fiction and non-fiction
    • Responds to a growing academic interest in stylistic matters
    • Analyzes the work of major nineteenth-century novelists including Austen, Dickens, Trollope, Thackeray and Eliot
    Read more

    Reviews & endorsements

    'Only in learning from Farina himself have I become more sensitized to the luminosity that inheres in the vernacular. Indeed, if we follow Farina along his chosen, if surprising path, we will enjoy the rewards of discovery - about character, the novel, and realism, about written worlds and the social existences we all inhabit. … [This book] has sharpened my awareness of how we use language with one another, even in my own everyday life.' Barabara Black, Review 19

    'Moving gracefully between the smallest units of language and the largest, Farina provides abundant insights into a range of nineteenth-century issues and texts. … Scholars of realism, liberal aesthetics, and what was once called the 'Victorian temper' will find much to interest and excite them.' Matthew Sussman, Modern Philology

    See more reviews

    Customer reviews

    Not yet reviewed

    Be the first to review

    Review was not posted due to profanity

    ×

    , create a review

    (If you're not , sign out)

    Please enter the right captcha value
    Please enter a star rating.
    Your review must be a minimum of 12 words.

    How do you rate this item?

    ×

    Product details

    • Date Published: February 2019
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9781316632789
    • dimensions: 229 x 152 x 17 mm
    • weight: 0.429kg
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Acknowledgements
    Abbreviations
    Epigraphs
    1. Darwin's view from Todgers's: 'A decided turn' for character and common words
    2. Inductive 'attentions': Jane Austen in 'particular' and in 'general'
    3. 'Our skeptical as if': conditional analogy and the comportment of Victorian prose
    4. 'Something' in the way realism moves: Middlemarch and oblique character references
    5. 'Whoever explains a 'but'': tact and friction in Trollope's reparative fiction
    Afterword
    Notes
    Bibliography
    Index.

  • Author

    Jonathan Farina, Seton Hall University, New Jersey
    Jonathan Farina is Associate Professor of Nineteenth-Century British Literature at Seton Hall University, New Jersey, where he is Director of the Center for Literature and the Public Sphere, and an Associate Director of the Honors Program. He is Associate Editor of The Wordsworth Circle.

Sign In

Please sign in to access your account

Cancel

Not already registered? Create an account now. ×

Sorry, this resource is locked

Please register or sign in to request access. If you are having problems accessing these resources please email lecturers@cambridge.org

Register Sign in
Please note that this file is password protected. You will be asked to input your password on the next screen.

» Proceed

You are now leaving the Cambridge University Press website. Your eBook purchase and download will be completed by our partner www.ebooks.com. Please see the permission section of the www.ebooks.com catalogue page for details of the print & copy limits on our eBooks.

Continue ×

Continue ×

Continue ×

Find content that relates to you

Join us online

This site uses cookies to improve your experience. Read more Close

Are you sure you want to delete your account?

This cannot be undone.

Cancel

Thank you for your feedback which will help us improve our service.

If you requested a response, we will make sure to get back to you shortly.

×
Please fill in the required fields in your feedback submission.
×