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The Good International Citizen
Australian Peacekeeping in Asia, Africa and Europe 1991–1993

Volume 3. The Official History of Australian Peacekeeping, Humanitarian and Post-Cold War Operations

£126.00

  • Date Published: April 2014
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781107021624
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  • Volume 3 of the official history of Australian peacekeeping, humanitarian and post-cold war operations explores Australia's involvement in six overseas missions following the end of the Gulf War: Cambodia (1991–99); Western Sahara (1991–94); the former Yugoslavia (1992–2004); Iraq (1991); Maritime Interception Force operations (1991–99); and the contribution to the inspection of weapons of mass destruction facilities in Iraq (1991–99). These missions reflected the increasing complexity of peacekeeping, as it overlapped with enforcement of sanctions, weapons inspections, humanitarian aid, election monitoring and peace enforcement. Granted full access to all relevant Australian Government records, David Horner and John Connor provide readers with a comprehensive and authoritative account of Australia's peacekeeping operations in Asia, Africa and Europe.

    • Granted full access to all relevant Australian Government records, David Horner and John Connor provide readers with a comprehensive and authoritative account of Australia's peacekeeping operations in Asia, Africa and Europe
    • The authors describe the experiences of peacekeepers on the ground in order to show how tasks were planned and executed, placing them within the broader historical and political backgrounds of each mission
    • This volume shows how Australian policy in the post-Cold War era was driven as much by the idea of being a good international citizen as it was by narrow national interest
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    Customer reviews

    19th Dec 2014 by Fielding

    The Good International Citizen is the second volume of the five-volume Official History of Australian Peacekeeping, Humanitarian and Post-Cold War Operations series. The first published volume Australia and the New World Order: from Peacekeeping to Peace-enforcement 1988-1991 was published in 2011. This volume explores Australias involvement in six overseas missions following the end of the 1991 Gulf War: Cambodia 1991–99 Western Sahara 1991–94 the former Yugoslavia 1992–2004 Iraq 1991 Maritime Interception Force operations 1991–99 and the contribution to the inspection of weapons of mass destruction facilities in Iraq 1991–99. These six missions were all initiated during 1991 and some of them continued in various forms for many years. These six missions reflected the increasing complexity of peacekeeping, as it overlapped with enforcement of sanctions, weapons inspections, humanitarian aid, election monitoring and peace enforcement. The phrase ‘good international citizen’ was politically popular at the time, but was accompanied by a diminishing sense of confidence in multilateralism and a ‘new world order’. With full access to all relevant Australian Government records, David Horner and John Connor provide readers with a comprehensive and authoritative account. This volume shows how Australian policy in the immediate post-Cold War era was driven as much by the idea of being a good international citizen as it was by narrow national interest. As the official historian for the series, Horner uses the preface to explain the approach used and why it is different to earlier official histories. He explains…“for this series we have tried to tell the story of the respective missions at three levels: the strategic level, in which we have concentrated on the government’s decision-making process the operational level, in which we sought to explain how the Australian Defence Force ADF and other agencies planned and executed their tasks and the tactical or personal level, in which we try to describe what the participants actually did in the field.” The end result of the approach is a very comprehensive and coherent account of Australia’s contribution and involvement in these multinational operations. David Horner is the Professor of Australian Defence History in the Strategic and Defence Studies Centre at the Australian National University. In 2004 Horner was appointed the Official Historian of Australian Peacekeeping, Humanitarian and Post–Cold War Operations series. Dr John Connor is a senior lecturer in history at the University of New South Wales, Canberra. Connor previously worked in the official history team at the Australian War Memorial from 2004 to 2007. The main body of The Good International Citizen is over 500 pages in length. It also includes a detailed chronology of events between 1989 and 1999, a full list of abbreviations, two appendices and a comprehensive index. Unsurprisingly, the bibliography is extensive and a valuable tool for future researchers in itself. There are a large number of colour plates which include maps and photographs, as well as some black and white figures, tables and maps throughout the text. In all, about 4,000 ADF members participated in these six overseas missions and as Horner concludes Australians should be proud of the achievements of those who took part. As with previous peace-keeping operations, the missions were arduous, demanding and sometimes hazardous. Australia’s good fortune in avoiding casualties largely continued. One Australian, Major Susan Felsche, was killed on UN service in Western Sahara. I commend The Good International Citizen to those who seek a better understanding the context, complexities and challenges of Australia’s military operations in the immediate post-Cold War era. Marcus Fielding

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    Product details

    • Date Published: April 2014
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9781107021624
    • length: 668 pages
    • dimensions: 252 x 178 x 40 mm
    • weight: 1.29kg
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    Part I. Strategy and Policy:
    1. Peacekeeping after the Gulf War: Australian defence policy:
    1991
    2. Peacekeeping in the new world order: Australia's response:
    1991–1996
    Part II. Cambodia:
    3. From Angkor Wat to Pol Pot: Cambodia to 1988
    4. Law and order on the border: the Australian federal police and the UN border relief organisation, 1989–1993
    5. An Australian peace proposal: the Cambodian peace agreement:
    1989–1991
    6. First into Phnom Penh: the Australian army contingent in the UN advance mission in Cambodia:
    1991–1992
    7. The roadblock: Australians in the UN transitional authority in Cambodia, February–May 1992
    8. Change in plan: Australians in the UN transitional authority in Cambodia, June–December 1992
    9. 'Democracy's surprise triumph': Australians in the UN transitional authority in Cambodia:
    1993
    10. Developing operation banner: Australian military assistance to Cambodia:
    1994–1997
    11. Winding up operation banner: the end of Australian military assistance to Cambodia:
    1997–1999
    Part III. Western Sahara:
    12. A good international citizen: Australia's commitment to Western Sahara:
    1990–1991
    13. Backbone of the mission: the Australians in Western Sahara:
    1991–1994
    Part IV. Former Yugoslavia:
    14. Roads not taken: Australian peacekeeping in the Former Yugoslavia:
    1991–1996
    15. A modest commitment: Australian peacekeepers in the Former Yugoslavia:
    1997–2004
    Part V. Watch on Iraq:
    16. A new type of commitment: humanitarian relief in Kurdistan: May–June 1991
    17. Disarming Iraq: sanctions and weapons inspection:
    1991–1992
    18. A limited liability: Australia and the hunt for Saddam's weapons:
    1993–1997
    19. UNSCOM and the US alliance: Australia re-commits forces to the Gulf:
    1997–1999.

  • Authors

    David Horner, Australian National University, Canberra
    David Horner is a Professor of Australian Defence History at the Australian National University.

    John Connor, University of New South Wales, Sydney
    Dr John Connor is a Senior Lecturer in History at the University of New South Wales.

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